kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Kate ([personal profile] kate_nepveu) wrote2012-03-22 18:08
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Upsetting but important things

You know, I was going to make a post about how the intersection of the news lately (particularly Trayvon Martin's murder) and the bridge of a Decemberists song nearly had my crying in my car yesterday evening, but the point would just be what the subject line says, and this gives you more time to read the links.

[*] Yes, I saw the doctor guest post over at Scalzi's. I actually found it more depressing than anything because of the comments, and not even the predictable derailing ones, the "for the first time I feel some hope!" remarks. Seriously? One anonymous doctor arguing for civil disobedience after one of these horrible laws has passed—the efficacy of which I have considerable doubts regarding—and suddenly everything's sunshine and roses? What-fucking-ever. (Especially given the entirely unjustified assumption by many commenters that the anonymous doctor in question was male. Yeah, we've never seen that pattern before.)

turnberryknkn: (life on wards)

[personal profile] turnberryknkn 2012-03-23 15:33 (UTC)(link)
Both absolutely true.

The larger question -- which, as you point out, different people can come to different conclusions about -- is whether there is some limit to what they can make one do.

To throw out another example, what if legislators proposed that doctors who provide abortions should be required to brand women who recieve them? Doctors would be "allowed" to use anesthesia, so the branding would be painless; and women would be "allowed" to choose the location of the pencil-head sized brand, such that it could be somewhere -- under the armpit, between the buttocks, the roof of the mouth -- where even sexual partners might not see it. The (insane) theory that having a tangible, permanent reminder of the prior decision to have an abortion, would "encourage" women to make different choices. With enough lidocaine and nerve blocks, one *could* apply the brand without pain; a small enough brand would not cause functional morbidity, and with the right choice of location, it would be overlooked by everyone except the patient themselves. Would Amanda Marcotte also believe doctors should obey that law? Because, really, is a small brand placed under anesthesia any "worse" than a awake forced pelvic ultrasound? Where is the line?

Hard questions. But deeply relevant ones.