This was enjoyed by all members of Chateau Steelypips; it was amusingly self-aware and meta in ways that don't detract from kidly enjoyment of the slapstick. (I mean, it opens with Batman in voice-over saying something like, "BLACK. All serious movies start with a black screen.")

I have not seen all of The LEGO Movie, but the bits I did, didn't impress me: oh look, it's the one cool girl, again, and also daddy issues, whee. This movie is still dude-heavy, with just one of the four central hero characters being female, but at least the Mayor is also a woman? And I love that Barbara Gordon is Commissioner here, with Jim Gordon retiring and very emphatically shuffled off-screen, also that she is firmly on the side of Batman working with the police, not as a vigilante.

Here are some extremely mild spoilers, because this is not the kind of movie where the plot is a surprise:

spoilers )

Trailers:

* Power Rangers: is "gritty" really the appropriate aesthetic?

* The Boss Baby: please no.

* Cars 3 teaser: [personal profile] mariness had said that it reduced a theater of kids to tears, so when I realized what it had to be I warned the kids, and they were fine.

* Some live-action thing that looked earnest and kind of too adult and that entirely failed to make an impression on me, even after I looked through the forthcoming list at IMDB.
Doctor Strange: damn it, I had successfully avoided seeing this ball of whitewashing Orientalist crap until tonight.

Rogue One: yay female protagonist, boo leading a team of only other dudes, otherwise can't really tell.

Jason Bourne (the version I saw did not have the first few seconds of this, but started with the overhead shot of Jason on the bed): if this movie fridges Julia Stiles' character I will be REALLY ANGRY. Also I just don't think that there's anything left to say in this franchise?

The Shallows: nice to see a survival action movie about a woman, I guess?

Kubo and the Two Strings: there are a whole lot of white actors' names getting top billing of this fantasy-Japan animated story.

Suicide Squad: awww, lookit the trailer trying so hard, aren't you precious?!

I didn't take notes, so this is reconstructed by scrolling through IMDB (and thus is in order of release date).

  • Crimson Peak. Still wish I watched horror, which I do not, because look how pretty they all are/this all is.
  • In the Heart of the Sea. Thanks, but I think Master and Commander has filed my lifetime quota for all-dude maritime period pieces. (It does have the actress who played Arabella Strange, Charlotte Riley—who, whoa, I did not realize was married to Tom Hardy!—as Chris Hemsworth's long-suffering wife waiting at home, though.)
  • The Big Short. So let me get this straight. This is a movie about four white dudes who profited off the 2008 housing collapse and we are supposed to ROOT FOR THEM?! Fuck off and die. (Also, two women speak in the trailer: a complicit banker and a stripper. I am not joking.)
  • Joy. Biopic starring Jennifer Lawrence (who at some points looks so much like Renee Zellweger that it distracted me). I have no interest in it but hope it does well.
  • Concussion. About the doctor who first published research on CTE in NFL players. Nice subtle makeup job of making Will Smith just enough different-looking that he's not immediately Will Smith!! when you first see him. I decided before last season that I could no longer care about the NFL, for this among other reasons, so I also hope this does well.
  • The Revenant. Does this fridge Leonardo DiCaprio's brown son as part of his motivation for vengeance against Tom Hardy? Sure looks like it. Pass.
  • The Forest. Starring Natalie Dormer (+), horror (-), set in Aokigahara (-).

And I think that's it. So, so many trailers.

Saw it last night. It's better than I expected but not as good as many people seem to find it.

I saw it described numerous places as a two-hour chase scene and that just sounded really tiring, especially combined with its over-the-top aesthetic. But it does know that viewers need quiet moments to catch their breath and the pacing works pretty well—though I misunderstood spoilers and thought the movie ended somewhat sooner than it actually did, so that was a little weird for me.

I've seen a lot of praise for the action scenes, particularly their use of actual vehicles. To me, something about the way the first vehicle sequence was shot didn't make it look any more or less "real" than good CGI—I think it may have been slowing down and speeding up things for effect? It wasn't very engaging, anyway, though not as distancing as the truly terrible opening sequence of Ultron. By the last big setpiece I was engaged, but that was probably as much emotional as anything. And, overall, the aesthetic was not particularly my thing (except for Imperator Furiosa, Charlize Theron's character, which (a) has her face and (b) is about the most simple thing in the movie).

Yes, it is about the toxicity of masculinity in a sexist world, and yes, there are lots of matter-of-factly disabled characters, including at least one and possibly two protagonists, depending on how you view things. (However, there is just one obviously non-white character.) But enough was done right about sexism and the female characters that three moments spotlighting male characters at the expense of female characters felt particularly jarring to me—not enough to completely overcome the overall effect, but enough to be distracting and unpleasant.

Finally for general comments, many of the logistics make zero sense, as people have noted. The majority of them I can accept as (a) the product of a deranged mind who doesn't care so much about efficiency as supporting a cult (the water distribution, human milk, gasoline wasting) or (b) the price of admission (Max's likely age). The one I can't actually handwave past is Furiosa having the position she does, actually; she's the only woman we see driving rigs or in a position of explicit authority over men, and I have no idea how she could've got there in this atmosphere. There'd be no movie otherwise, so, price of admission, but I care about her unlike Max, so I poke at the question. (Well, I care about Max, but only with Furiosa. I started getting into the action sequences when they started wordlessly working together, handing each other weapons and trading off shots; and as Chad tells me someone said, there is more chemistry in the bit with the shoulder rest than in the entirety of Ultron.)

Before I get into spoilers, the last thing I can say outside a cut is that that song "Matches" I mentioned last week is totally apropos to this movie. *puts on repeat*

Now, for spoilers. First a thing that is a moderate spoiler but is also an important content note/trigger warning that I haven't seen mentioned elsewhere (though I haven't been reading a ton of stuff about this movie):

moderate spoiler, content note/trigger warning )

And now for the rest of the spoilers.

spoilers )

New-to-me trailers:

Vacation. Oh geez, make it stop. (NSFW.)

San Andreas. I am so fucking over the expectation that I will find the deaths of millions entertaining. Especially when the trailer ends with a super-cynical effort to mitigate its own disaster porn by linking to a disaster preparedness website. Fuck. Off.

Crimson Peak. Nice to see a trailer for something I won't see because it looks good at what it does. (I don't do horror. Which is too bad because, Jessica Chastain's face.)

Terminator Genisys. I like that they're starting with Sarah already badass, but do we really need to keep doing this? I don't think so.

The Transporter Refueled. I entirely checked out during this, other than to note that Jason Statham apparently is too expensive for these now.
Another pretty dire lot.

Southpaw: dead wife, daughter taken away, boxing, blah blah manpain.

Jurassic World: I'm pretty sure I'd get more enjoyment of out re-reading If The Velociraptor From Jurassic Park Were Your Girlfriend.

Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice: holy shit it's actually worse than everyone's jokes about it.

Pixels: here I was, desperately hoping for something fun, I actually laughed at the appearance of Pac-Man, and then boom! Adam Sandler. GAH.

Fantastic Four: it might be the contrast, but this didn't look actively terrible? Not, like distinctive or necessary or anything, but not actively terrible. (It was this one; I gather others were different.) I still roll my eyes that they couldn't cast Sue as a black woman too—I mean, yes, it's absolutely possible that she and Johnny are biological sibs, rather than adopted, but actual literal visibility matters. (Yes, I'm aware about the potential relevance to Sue's powers, but still: cast a very-light-skinned black woman if that's what you're going for.)

Tomorrowland: this is the second trailer I've seen for this, and at least it gives me way more of a sense than the first one? I'm still unsure about it, though.

Ant-Man: well, this trailer was more appealing to me than Guardians, which pisses me off because it'll probably do just as well and I don't want it to, because of (presumed spoiler) and also because I still resent its existence.
Chad desperately needed a break so we enlisted the babysitter and went to see this.

The nice thing about hearing about it from many different avenues is that my expectations were very low and it exceeded them. I honestly cannot say that it is a good movie, but it is less bad than I was expecting—see: very low expectations. I thought I was going to have to force myself to find things to like about it, and in fact I did not, I genuinely enjoyed myself. I think I'm going to go with "delightfully batshit" as my two-word summary.

The thing is, as many non-professional-reviewers have said, it is a straight-up unashamed id-tastic power fantasy for young women. And somewhat along the lines of what [personal profile] metaphortunate has been saying about women's fantasies WRT Fifty Shades, it's hard for me not to see the over-the-top-ness of it being devalued by a lot of critics because it's got a young woman at the center. Putting Fifty Shades aside, because that is a discussion I do not want to host for a number of reasons:

Jupiter Ascending is a secret-heir power fantasy, kitchen-sink variety, with: gorgeously expansive visuals; lots of chase and fight scenes; inexplicable scenery chewing; what I would swear is a Princess Bride homage; good momentum except for an ill-advised bureaucracy parody part-way through (it's only 2:07, which is downright speedy for a Wachowski sibs movie); non-white people who may only be in secondary roles but at least don't die for the white heroes (I wanna be Captain Tsing); and a critique of capitalism that is crashingly unsubtle but is also less insipid than Interstellar's big message. There are way, way worse recipes for a big-budget SFF movie. And, seriously: I did not have to force myself to enjoy it.

SPOILERS )

Trailers:

Ant-Man, which I continue to resent the existence of.

Chappie, which looks like a completely different movie in the new trailer. I'm still not sure it's a movie I want to see (that body language keeps driving me nuts, it's so obviously human-inna-suit), but the difference between that and the first trailer is kind of stunning.

Spy. I am allergic to the kind of comedy that Melissa McCarthy does, as I am to almost all movie comedy, frankly, but I hope she kicks ass in the movie and at the box office.

Run All Night, which looks like a positively loathsome specimen of the Liam Neeson-as-inexplicable-badass subgenre.

Ted 2. I somehow missed the existence of the first movie and I wish that happy state of affairs had continued, as I am fairly sure brain cells died in protest at watching that trailer.

Focus, which is a Will Smith con-man movie, and which I might love or loathe depending on how the tone, treatment of women, etc., shakes out.

My post about The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies went up today at Tor.com.

The new-to-me trailers were:

  • Tomorrowland (IMDB). I recognize that a tried-and-true version of the portal fantasy is going there to discover that you have political agency here, but the way this phrased things I didn't have any faith that it would get to the second step, and so I was really mad.
  • Kingsman: The Secret Service (IMDB). Things I could give zero fucks about: a white boy learning he's ~~special~~ in a school that teaches him to wield his talents for violence and rulebreaking on behalf of the state, with the only black face I noticed as the bad guy.
  • San Andreas (IMDB). Nice to see Dwayne Johnson as the lead, but disaster porn isn't my thing.
  • Mad Max: Fury Road (IMDB). Well, I suspect it realizes how ridiculous it is?

I deliberately avoided finding out much about Interstellar because a while ago I suggested to Chad that we get a babysitter and go see it, as a much-needed break. Here's my verdict.

It's science fiction that's worth seeing if (a) you want to be up on the state of the genre; (b) you like Nolan's visuals and/or space; (c) you really really like sarcastic robots or Jessica Chastain's face, which are small but notable parts of the movie; or (d) you have a high tolerance for at least one plot hole you could drive a truck through and what I am too tired to find a tactful way to call something other than mystical twaddle. (Chad's term, not mine, though he liked it better than I did.) Also a lot of time, because holy fuck, it's long.

so, so many SPOILERS )

Trailers:

Selma (IMDB). I have literally no idea if this is a good trailer because almost the moment it started I was digging my nails into my hands to keep from bursting into tears out of all the present-day resonances. At least it's being made by Oprah Winfrey's company, i.e., not by white people.

The Gambler (IMDB). I have insufficient space to describe the ways in which this is repellent to me.

Chappie (IMDB). The robot's body language is too obviously a human in a suit, and it just doesn't look fresh, which is a disappointment from the District 9 director.

Furious 7 (IMDB). You should watch this trailer, because it has an objectively ridiculous but really fun heist in the first half and a shot that is a literal row of pretty brown people.

Avengers: Age of Ultron (IMDB). If you care about this, you've already seen it and my feelings about it.

Exodus: Gods and Kings (IMDB). WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG. (Also, please tell me that subtitle doesn't mean it's the start of a series.)

Mockingjay - Part 1 (IMDB). I love you, Katniss! Which makes me very afraid for this movie, but I'll see it anyway.

(I think that's all. I didn't take notes but I went forward through the IMDB's forthcoming pages looking for things I recognized. It was also a lot of trailers.)
but it is not this day. Saw it again tonight, this time with Chad.

spoilers, of course )

Only different trailer was for The Giver, which looked like a bog-standard boring YA dystopia before the title reveal. (Somehow I made it out of the US educational system without reading it, so I don't know if I'd have recognized it beforehand.)

Oh my god this day. Here, let me dump some more Captain America: The Winter Soldier feelings. (I haven't seen it again, because free time, hah!)

Spoilers for the MCU )

additional spoiler from comics )

Some fic recs, which I think ought to be pretty clear what they're like from the tags and summaries:

cut for length )

Finally, an addendum to my post about the trailers: an important critique of Lucy.

I've got the kids' Cold of Doom, surprise surprise, and took an unplanned snooze getting His Pipliness down for his nap, so something easy to get my brain working again. Here are the trailers I had with Captain America: The Winter Soldier (more thoughts on which coming, unsurprisingly).

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: no. Absolutely not. (Grimdark? The Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles?!)

Lucy: if it weren't "let me make a damn Black Widow movie, already," I would be a titch concerned about how much like The Matrix it looks like, but hey: let Scarlett Johansson make a damn Black Widow movie, already.

Blended: As if Adam Sandler and romcom weren't bad enough, they had to go set it in Africa. Run away! Run away!

The Amazing Spider-Man 2: I still have no interest in this.

X-Men: Days of Future Past: I'd like to be convinced, but (1) I am allergic to time-travel stories and (2) even if Brian Singer is back, I'm not sure how much goodwill I have left for this franchise. The trailer is notable for having some really impressive eyefucking and at least three perfect single tears, which . . . I dunno, could be good or bad depending on my mood, I guess.

Maleficent: I love her design, and I have zero idea what kind of story is coming out of it.

Guardians of the Galaxy: I don't want to like this movie, and nothing about the trailer is making me feel conflicted about this stance. (The audience was pretty cold toward it.)
In honor of finishing my immense Tor.com post about The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug, to be linked here when it goes live, notes on the trailers!

Unfortunately the notes I took in the theater got eaten, so I have to reconstruct this by looking at upcoming movies on IMDB. Let's see, the new-to-me ones were:

Earth to Echo: almost content-free trailer about teenagers finding an alien something in their neighborhood.

The Amazing Spider-Man 2: I didn't see the prior one, but this looked derivative and boring as fuck.

Edge of Tomorrow: an SF-war meets Groundhog Day story in which Emily Blunt has way more screen presence than Tom Cruise.

Jupiter Ascending: seriously epic-looking SF from the Wachowskis, with a female chosen one (yay!) who seems to be in peril a lot (boo!), and . . . stuff, I honestly don't know what else, just a lot of stuff. Oh, wait, Sean Bean, who presumably will screw up and die in some more-or-less affecting way.

Also, we got the Captain American: The Winter Soldier trailer, which is not new to me, but eeee big screen! I already talked at great length about that (spoilers for more than just the trailer), so let me just add that there was a scene of mass destruction without Inception-style horn blares on the soundtrack, hooray.
Time for a break from law, so, trailers!

Divergent: I watched this trailer and I said, "I remember that someone on my reading list posted about how silly and implausible this YA dystopia is." And lo, it was so.

I, Frankenstein: the idea of Frankenstein's monster as incredibly long-lived and basically a superhero is actually pretty great, but I doubt this is the movie to do it justice.

Endless Love: it caught my attention for putting ominous music behind sappy meet-cute romance, but the hints about the reveal didn't seem very interesting. (However, IMDB says it's a remake of a Brooke Shields movie, which does get genuinely dark, so perhaps that music is earned even if the trailer's contents don't convey it.)

American Hustle: this trailer is much less off-putting than the first one I saw, though still not my kind of thing.

Maleficent: it's remarkable the way they managed to make this live-action Sleeping Beauty look like a cartoon.

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty: I'm not sure if this is the version I saw before Gravity, but it's still just wrong.

While we were on vacation in Baltimore, we went to see The World's End, the pub crawl/not-so-stealth SF movie by the team who did Shaun of the Dead and Hot Fuzz. The trailer made this look entirely not my thing—dudes going back to their hometown to attempt to finish an epic pub crawl of their lamented youth, with lots of fight scenes, whatever—but I read spoilers because that's a thing I do, and as I thought from those, I did end up liking it.

I don't think it gives away too much to say that the rosy, nostalgia-laden description of the first pub crawl at the opening of the movie . . . is revealed to be given by one of the now-middle-aged participants in a group therapy session, Gary. The movie really does kind of a remarkable job in communicating that, actually, it is sad that Gary regards that never-finished pub crawl as the lost opportunity of his life, the high point to which he wishes to return, and that he is not in fact a very healthy person. (In a sympathetic way, not a point-and-laugh, meanspirited way.)

The fight scenes were still kind of long, and its portrayal of female characters is not very good, but it is funny and it has nice details, like the pub names and what happens in each. (If you like beer, though, be prepared to come out with a terrible thirst.)

And now, SPOILERS.

SPOILERS )

Trailers: dire. We had:

  • A pair of movies about white boys doing bad things, with women solely as sexually-alluring decoration (The Wolf of Wall Street and American Hustle);
  • Tired humiliation comedy with a women-as-property premise (Ride-Along);
  • A Jackass movie, really, these are still being made?! (Bad Grandpa);
  • And a horror movie, during which I got distracted trying to decide if the unsafe crib arrangement shown was a hint it was in the past, a hint about the parents, or just the filmmakers choosing the expected visual over demonstrating proper safety (probably the latter) (Insidious 2).

    (For those unfamiliar with current practice: no pillows, blankets, stuffed animals, padding, etc. in cribs of infants, just a baby and a fitted sheet. Also, you put them down on their backs until they're old enough to roll over on their own.)

So, I suspect that's my last movie until either Catching Fire or the next Hobbit installment, whichever we can get to first.

I forgot to post about the trailers with Pacific Rim! Not an inspiring batch, I have to say. Linking to IMDB because I can't be bothered to track down the trailers.

Seventh Son: looks like bog-standard extruded fantasy product. Allegedly based on some hit fantasy series, which had me & Chad whispering "What?!" at each other. (Wikipedia says it's based on a kid's series called The Wardstone Chronicles.)

Gravity: the bits in the trailer looked tense, but I don't feel like that's enough to judge.

The World's End: if you have Martin Freeman in your movie and he is not featured heavily in the trailer then I question your life choices.

Anchorman: The Legend Continues: ugh.

Captain Phillips: Tom Hanks fights off Somali pirates. I couldn't put up with his accent even if the movie didn't have an uphill battle to avoid being incredibly racist.

2 Guns: I doubt that Mark Wahlberg can hold his own against Denzel Washington in an odd-couple law-enforcement-on-the-run flick. Also it contains a woman in a fridge.

And something else I can't decipher my notes for. I was hoping for the new Catching Fire trailer to admire it on the big screen, but no. (I know the books get to be an unholy mess, but damn, the people making the movies know their business.)
And now, I continue my pop-culture brain dump with a movie that hardly anyone I know saw (though it did unexpectedly well at the box office) and that isn't in theaters any more, because I believe in putting these things on the record: Now You See Me, the magic-show-as-heist flick with Mark Ruffalo, Michael Caine, and Morgan Freeman.

It opens with four individuals being observed by a mysterious figure in a hoodie (not a mysterious hooded figure; that's Welcome to Night Vale, which is next in my queue, I think). One is Woody Harrelson, using hypnosis to be a blackmailing asshole. One is the guy from The Social Network (Jesse Eisenberg), doing large-scale card tricks and being kind of a dick. One is a woman (Isla Fisher) doing a straight-up escape trick and being fierce. And one is some young guy (Dave Franco) picking pockets. They're all brought together for some mysterious plan . . . and then a year later, are running a magic show in Las Vegas with Michael Caine as their backer. Mark Ruffalo is the FBI agent assigned to investigate the aftermath of the show; Morgan Freeman is a professional debunker of magic tricks.

The thing about caper movies is that they need two things. On the mechanics side, they need both a satisfyingly non-obvious trick and a satisfyingly fair reveal. And on the story side, they need a reasonably just, by the standards of the genre, conclusion.

Now You See Me does well with the first at the beginning, but gets pretty wobbly in this regard thereafter. (I should never think "that's stupid" during an explanation; ideally I should never think it, but at least have it wait until the next day or even just the drive home.) As for the second . . .

SPOILERS. )

Because this was back at the start of June, my partial notes on the trailers are all outdated except one, which is:

The Mortal Instruments: City of Bones: there is no justice in the world.

My post about The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is now up at Tor.com. SPOILERS for the movie and everything Tolkien.

Trailers (links to YouTube):

  • The Host: this ought to be full of id-tastic possibilities, but the acting seems boring as fuck, even if it weren't Stephenie Meyer.
  • The Lone Ranger: you have got. to. be. kidding.
  • After Earth: Will Smith and son in a post-apocalyptic child-in-jeopardy story. I notice they don't mention M. Night Shyamalan as the director.
  • Oblivion: another post-apocalyptic grimdark story, this time with Tom Cruise. No thank you.
  • Man of Steel: didn't they just reboot Superman? I'm confused. Also bored.
  • Star Trek Into Darkness: having not seen the first, all I can say is that the soundtrack of Inception has a lot to answer for. *horn blare* Also, look, more grimdark!
  • Jack the Giant Slayer: look! something not grimdark! Unfortunately the title character is clearly trying to be Westley in The Princess Bride (he even calls himself a farmboy at one point). And the actor is so pudding-faced and bland that it's hard to believe he's the title character, let alone Westley. (It's worth watching the first thirty seconds just to hear Ian McKellen's voiceover, though.)

The AV Club has a review. I imagine it's only in limited release, what with the whole "French animated movie about a cat who gains the power of speech by eating a parrot in 1930s Algeria and immediately distresses his owner, a rabbi, by lying" thing, but if it's not playing in your area now would be a good time to check out the absolutely charming graphic novels that it's based on.

trailer with hardcoded English subtitles )

Went to see Cloud Atlas tonight, so I type in-between eating pita chips because it is a long fucking movie and having the babysitter not put the kids to bed meant skipping dinner.

Umm. It was a movie? It's kind of hard to say, because it is really just full of ALL THE THINGS. I'm pretty sure I'm glad I saw it, but it's a little stunning in both senses of the word.

So this is a movie adapted (apparently fairly loosely in substance as well as form) from a well-known book that I have not read, which takes six stories from the mid-nineteenth century to a post-apocalyptic far future and shuffles them together thematically and with the same actors playing multiple parts.

The intercutting actually worked surprisingly well for me; I didn't have any trouble following where we were or what was going on, and I liked the way things began overlapping very closely toward the end. I was mostly tracking the progress of the movie by the first-closest future timeline, which has the most-obviously-an-endpoint that we are introduced to early, so somewhere in the middle-ish I did find myself wondering how close we were getting to that end. (I mentioned that it's a very long movie?)

Less successful was the multiple actors, for two reasons. One, for a $100 million movie (ha, ha, I remembered that it was largely independently-financed and dropped a zero in talking to Chad, which was absolutely ridiculous of me), sometimes the makeup was just awfully obvious as makeup. Maybe I was spoiled by tiny!Steve Rogers in Captain America, which was all digital? Maybe I've just spent too much time thinking about makeup from watching that silly reality show Face Off? (About which finale all I really have to say is that I hate that they moved the winner to a popular vote.) I don't know, but it distracted me.

Second, the first future plotline is set in Korea and there are only two actual Asian people in the main cast. And I found the modifications to the other actors' eyelids to try and make them look Asian not just awkward to look at from a "that's not a real face" point of view, but viscerally disturbing and upsetting. I actually think the filmmakers' reasons for this do not suck, for a change, but it really bothered me all the same. So, not that you all need my approval to chose not to see a movie that does this, but you should be aware that this is one of the things that the movie is full of. (There are at least two instances where non-white actors play white characters; I cannot think off the top of my head of any other instances where white actors play non-white characters. This is probably because the rest of the storylines are set in majority-white populations.)

What else? There were definitely times when I wanted to say, "Yes, I get it" at the screen when someone was talking about choices recurring and reverberating and interconnectedness and so forth, sometimes simultaneous with feeling warm-and-fuzzy about it. I feel like I want to make a really big chart to track and analyze it all and also like I just want to leave it as a thing. Hugo Weaving chews scenery like he's a teething baby. The guy who was adorable as Tom Pullings in Master and Commander is also adorable in the composer segment, though it gets stolen out from under him by the other young guy, the actual composer. (Oh fine: James D'Arcy (tell me that's a stage name, because, seriously?) and Ben Whishaw (who is apparently going to be the new Q), respectively.) Lots of lows, some highs. Some suspense, though on reflection in only about half the plotlines; two proceeded basically as I thought and I was fine with that, one I didn't care terribly about, one I really didn't know what would happen, and two I was pretty sure I knew and wished I was wrong.

Basically this is a movie that believes very strongly in going big or going home. If that sounds appealing and you can get past the yellowface, go see it while it's in theaters.

Oh, right, trailers:

  • The Hobbit: weirdly on looking it up, it appears we got the first trailer, which explains why it said "next December" on it! I still do not have high hopes for this, but man, I have such a Pavlovian response to the instrumental Ring theme.
  • Les Misérables: I am pretty sure I do not want to see this but it was surprisingly good as a trailer anyway.
  • Anna Karenina: there has never been a trailer I was more surprised to see "Screenplay by Tom Stoppard" at the end of.
  • The Impossible: oh look, it's a movie about the 2004 South Asian tsunami that is all about a white family! *stabbity stab stab*
  • Gangster Squad: might as well have had "glorifying the (once lawful but now out of necessity really!) lawless elite" written all over it. What-fucking-ever.

30 days of gratitude:

past days, for my own reference )

  1. Babysitters. =>

February 2017

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