I've had this vague thesis for a while, that there two kinds of people, those who—well. Have a poll:

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 86


Tony Stark or Steve Rogers? (Marvel)

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Tony.
42 (54.5%)

Steve.
35 (45.5%)

Neal Caffrey or Peter Burke? (White Collar)

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Neal.
23 (50.0%)

Peter.
23 (50.0%)

Sherlock Holmes or John Watson? (Sherlock (BBC).)

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Sherlock.
15 (21.4%)

John.
55 (78.6%)

Ticky?

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Ticky.
28 (36.4%)

Ticky rejects the forced binary.
67 (87.0%)

(At one point I had more examples, but lost them. I also firmly expect to be in the minority on all of these, though I'm less certain whether there will be a pattern.)

Haywire: the weekend of Martin Luther King Jr. Day, I & the kids were staying with Chad's parents, and I escaped for a couple of hours to watch a movie. I was going to see Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, but then I saw [livejournal.com profile] glvalentine's review of Haywire and decided to see it instead: partly because it was shorter and partly because it sounded really interesting.

I liked this less than Genevieve, for two reasons. One, I missed the first few minutes and spent most of the movie wondering if it provided some kind of context for the main character's goals and situation. I'm not sure why I felt vaguely aswim—maybe just sleep deprivation?—since in the end it was pretty simple: she was betrayed, she escaped, she finds out why, she makes them pay. I think I wasn't sure what she knew at any given time. (It is a Soderbergh movie, which means non-linear and lots of significant verbal omissions. One of which convinced me that a certain character was doing completely the opposite of what it turned out to be, which didn't help matters.) Two, I'm not that fond of the type of action movie this is. I love competence porn in capers or action movies, but I like either character development or a reveal to go with it (Ronin, The Bourne Identity, Ocean's Eleven). Haywire is instead in the "main character gets revenge and returns to status quo" mold, which I find unsatisfying. I didn't get a strong hook as the movie unfolded (character development), and I didn't have any reason to revisit my conclusions at the end (reveal). Instead I felt, as the credits came up, "That was it?", and was left with more abstract admiration than enjoyment.

So, if you like that kind of thing, you need to see this, and if you don't, it's worth background watching when it comes on basic cable in a few years.

The other two episodes in season two of Sherlock: "The Hounds of Baskerville" was very silly and not at all scary and entertained me in a way that almost entirely failed to engage my brain. Thus, I have nothing else to say about it.

"The Reichenbach Fall" was mostly terrific: I liked the updating of the conflict, and that Moriarty toned the swoopy down, and spoilers, minor and major )

Face Off: this is, of all things, an original reality show on the SyFy network, in which contestants design and execute special effects makeup. I saw some commercials for it and then found the whole season free on demand on my cable system one day when I was out of DVRed things to half-watch while dealing with the Pip. Anyway, I like seeing the different designs and all the craft involved, and generally find the judging clear, educational, and reasonable. Despite my best efforts, though, I find myself having opinions about the contestants as people, which I was trying to avoid because I know how manipulatively these shows can be cut to create interpersonal conflict. There's very little of that, however, so if you like how-to kinds of shows this is worth checking out.

White Collar: I dropped this show for a long time but the second half of this just-concluded season has also been maternity-leave TV fodder. Most of it was background noise, and I actually watched a couple episodes mostly on FF, but I thought the season finale was genuinely strong. (Well, except for the worst green-screening I have seen in quite some time.) And wow, Beau Bridges has a talent for playing characters who get on my last nerve (I watched SGA before SG-1 and so was introduced to General Landry in a much more confrontational posture).

Some belated thoughts on the White Collar season finale:

spoilers )

In completely unrelated news: OMG CUTE.

So I realized, a few episodes ago, what the TV show White Collar is.

Despite having a con artist as one of its main characters, it's not a caper show (like Leverage) or an action/MacGyver-y show (like Burn Notice or, indeed, MacGyver). Instead, it's a cop show, subcategory reluctant-partners. This accounts for the (rather disappointing) paucity of capers, cons, and nifty technological tricks, and the generally slower pace.

(Perhaps this was obvious to others from the beginning, but I heard about the show through fannish osmosis and got the impression that it was much more like Leverage.)

Which brings me to the half-season finale which aired some time ago and which I only watched on DVR tonight.

spoilers )

SteelyKid is sleeping in this morning, so:

White Collar: new TV show, art forger reluctantly helps FBI to keep from going back to prison, having escaped to look for his girlfriend, who has gone *poof*. Fairly appealing leads, good diversity in cast, not hugely caper-y but had some clever moments. Didn't love it, liked it well enough, will do until Leverage comes back. (Speaking of which: "Accessories," a crossover between the two, general-audience, gen, 1300 words.)

quick spoilers )

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