kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I have posts I want to write but I'm solo parenting this week and didn't feel good last night so must sleep. Sleeeeeep.

(Though upon opening up the draft email where I accumulate things, there is a tiny bit of prose.)

Links:

In non-links news, I tag all my ebooks with genre to help me find things, but why don't I also tag them with things "extremely distinctive first-person narration" to really help me find what I'm in the mood for? Grr. (One of the things I want to be writing is about Ann Leckie's The Raven Tower.)

Finally, elsewhere a friend mentioned Crazy Rich Asians and Ralph Breaks the Internet in conjunction, and I was amused to realize that they both made me think about consumerism, probably in an unintentional way (I deliberately did not actually watch Ralph, just listened while I played games on my phone in the theater, because giving it my undivided attention would have mostly made me think about Disney's cultural dominance), and both had a female character I had a bit of a crush on (Astrid; the racer voiced by Gal Gadot). I suppose you can add in a third thing, that the emotional beats all worked and were solid in both, as long as you could roll with the consumerism.

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kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
The rhinoceros sent me off on a skim re-read of the Aubrey-Maturin books, which reminded me how, though I quite enjoyed the movie, I don't think either Aubrey or Maturin were properly cast. And thus:

Chris Hemsworth (in recent-Thor mode) would be the perfect Jack Aubrey, y/y?

Maturin . . . look, I think it's important that Maturin be scrawny. And I'm not particularly up on scrawny European dudes? So I've got nothing there.

Going purely off looks, Diana can be Katie McGrath (I haven't actually seen anything she's been in). Sophie's tall, so she can be Elizabeth Debicki, who does a nice coming-into-her-own arc in Widows.

And I spent all afternoon standing outside in the cold and I need to go to sleep now. Please feel free to contribute your own fancasts in comments (and to move the series in space and time so we can racebend).
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
So the Widows trailer, the one that made me want to see it, turns out to be pretty representative (though it's lighter on the heisting proper, which is deliberate). It's very satisfying on a character and theme level; the acting is great and it's shot very strikingly; but I have plot questions.

SPOILERS )

Ugh, I'm really tired and I ought to say more but, tired. Basically I agree with the AV Club. Good movie, go see it (if it's still in theaters; it was in the smallest in the theater we went to, though there were a respectable number of people in it).
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
I never much watched romcoms during their heyday, but I like non-stupid romance novels and Crazy Rich Asians got good reviews from Smart Bitches, Trashy Books and Caroline Siede, who I trust to notice if it's stupid romance-wise (Siede's When Romance Met Comedy series is great), plus, you know, represent, so why not?

It's very good at what it sets out to do, which is: ridiculously attractive people being charming; a central emotional conflict that was satisfying in its complexity and resolution; and lovingly-shot conspicuous consumption. By which I mean, if you can't roll with a secondary emotional arc being symbolized by a $1.2 million pair of earrings—and not, "here is everything else one could do with $1.2 million," either—then this is not the movie for you.

I enjoyed it very much! But I was constantly aware of what it was doing.

Also I discover from a Hollywood Reporter article that the male lead, Henry Golding, was basically an unknown (he is great) and that there was some controversy over his casting because he is biracial. That is … an issue on which I am not inclined to publicly pronounce at this time, except to say that a movie that has maybe no more than one non-Asian speaking part (Rachel's TA; is there anyone else?) is not in the same position as a movie with the inverse proportions. But it did remind me that the only dark-skinned Asian people were servants; I know just enough about to know that I don't know enough to say more, but it was definitely something I registered.

Edit: from comments, a couple of articles on the complexities here, no spoilers: Naomi Ishisaka in the Seattle Times (will need to pause adblocker); Ada Tseng in PRI.

A couple minor notes before spoilers:

There's a post-credits scene that I missed, alas.

I won't be reading the book, because it sounds much meaner than the movie. I think I will reread Alyssa Cole's Reluctant Royals series instead (A Princess in Theory, A Duke by Default) because they are exceedingly delightful and will scratch the same itch, except with more economic thoughtfulness. (Possibly also I will discover that the second book does address my plot quibble and I missed it!)

SPOILERS for the movie and the book )

Trailers, a weird mix:

A Star Is Born: still looks dreadful.

Smallfoot: still looks like a kids' movie.

Night School: is a thing that I am not the audience for.

Widows: still looks like a potentially immense, potentially guilty, pleasure.

On the Basis of Sex (has a few extra opening seconds that did not play in the theater): this movie is about Ruth Bader Ginsburg and needs a better title. I would like it to be good and do well and find it hard to imagine myself watching it.

Searching: the John Cho thriller that takes place solely on his laptop screen, and that got a lot of good buzz at Sundance. I knew of this solely because I saw a GQ interview with him that, relevantly, opens, "You’re the only Asian not in Crazy Rich Asians. Did you miss the meeting?"

Ocean's 8

Jun. 24th, 2018 10:28 pm
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
I enjoyed this as a bit of pretty, competent fluff, and I hope they picked 8 as the title so they can do a full trilogy without repeating numbers.

spoilers )

Trailers:

A Star Is Born: this looks dreadful, but you can see Anthony Ramos (who originated Laurens/Phillip in Hamilton) in the background, and awww I'm so happy for him!

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms. Well, it has more reason to exist than Beauty and the Beast?

Widows. This had me ready to follow Viola Davis anywhere.

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald: I continue in my indifference to all of J.K. Rowling's post-Deathly Hallows Potterverse stuff.

Peppermint (with a few prefatory seconds that weren't shown in the theater, which is vexing because it messes with the structure). Jennifer Garner does parent-turned-vigilante. I'm glad that women are getting this type of movie but, uh, pass. (It's possible that my reaction to this compared to Widows is a matter of the lead actors, but also I don't think Widows is trying to sell their actions as righteous, just survival.)

Edit: missed one, The Girl in the Spider's Web, I knew there was one more on IMDB that had extra stuff at the beginning. This is a Lisbeth Salander movie, I don't think I need to say anything else.

Bonus: this poster shows Mila Kunis and Kate McKinnon in The Spy Who Dumped Me and I am so, so sad to report that one of them had not dumped the other.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
While on vacation, I took the kids to see Coco (SteelyKid was recovering from a passing illness and something quiet seemed in order).

It was good! There was insufficient slapstick for the kids early on, so the scenes of family tension got me a few requests to stop watching, but by the end they proclaimed it "awesome!", especially the bit where justice was served. It was lovely to look at, thematically satisfying, and a little sniffly; I definitely recommend it, and also hope it will be useful in talking to the kids about death and grief. Also, (mild spoiler at link) I want these figurines just for the animals.

I tried to ignore the trailers so the only thing I can report is that when SteelyKid recognized A Wrinkle in Time from the basketballs-bouncing-in-unison bit, she flailed in joy. (She's read the graphic novel adaptation.)
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
So . . . that was a thing.

Okay, it is actually shaped like a movie. It required (at least) one explicitly-acknowledged "just because" in order to make the plot work, but by and large it was shaped like a movie and, as far as I can tell, got its exposition across—very obviously, granted, but I'm starting to think smooth exposition is no longer something movies care about? (Feel free to provide counter-examples.)

As a standalone movie, it's . . . unexceptional? I thought some of the special effects were oddly shoddy and uninspired, but it does contain gunfights, Idris Elba being grizzled and badass, and Matthew McConaughey waving his hands around, so if that's a thing you wanted from seeing the trailers, then you'll get it. I'm not sure that it would particularly zing or feel fresh, but it does generally provide what it promised, though there's a lot more of the kid, Jake, than one might expect.

(This review has movie spoilers but amused me and seems about right: The Dark Tower Is Not That Terrible — But It Does Feel Like a Copy of a Copy of a Copy, by David Edelstein at Vulture.)

As an adaptation, it makes some interesting choices, most of which I did not like.

all the spoilers for the movie and the entire book series, so many spoilers )
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
This was enjoyed by all members of Chateau Steelypips; it was amusingly self-aware and meta in ways that don't detract from kidly enjoyment of the slapstick. (I mean, it opens with Batman in voice-over saying something like, "BLACK. All serious movies start with a black screen.")

I have not seen all of The LEGO Movie, but the bits I did, didn't impress me: oh look, it's the one cool girl, again, and also daddy issues, whee. This movie is still dude-heavy, with just one of the four central hero characters being female, but at least the Mayor is also a woman? And I love that Barbara Gordon is Commissioner here, with Jim Gordon retiring and very emphatically shuffled off-screen, also that she is firmly on the side of Batman working with the police, not as a vigilante.

Here are some extremely mild spoilers, because this is not the kind of movie where the plot is a surprise:

spoilers )

Trailers:

* Power Rangers: is "gritty" really the appropriate aesthetic?

* The Boss Baby: please no.

* Cars 3 teaser: [personal profile] mariness had said that it reduced a theater of kids to tears, so when I realized what it had to be I warned the kids, and they were fine.

* Some live-action thing that looked earnest and kind of too adult and that entirely failed to make an impression on me, even after I looked through the forthcoming list at IMDB.

Moana

Jan. 15th, 2017 12:28 pm
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
I promised links at the Moana panel that just ended, so I might as well write that up first. The panel writeup will generally assume that you've read these because I'm hoping to get to a 1pm panel.

Good overview at Smithsonian.com: references the Long Pause in Polynesian exploration of the Pacific, the controversy over Maui's character design, the omission of Maui's companion goddess Hina, the various coconut-people and general coconut-related issues, and some details that were accurate and welcome.

More in the NYT about Maui's size.

The Guardian on authenticity as marketing tool (see: Vanity Fair), especially in the context of the economic effect of tourism on Hawaii.

A Twitter thread on complicated feelings from @fangirlJeanne.

Mari Ness on, among other things, the unexamined weirdness about the environmental message ("it’s a message that diminishes environmental issues down to “magic,” something largely beyond human control, and suggests that only “magic” can restore the environment").

(A kind person on ToastieSlack provided me with some of these links.)

my general thoughts on the movie )

Notes about today's panel. I will say above the cut that I do not set out to be the Designated Harsher of Squee, but that I find these questions of representation important and if I'm going to be the only one making the case, well, so be it even if it's tiring and frustrating (it is).

Usual disclaimer: it's easier for me to remember what I said because, well, I'm the one who said it; I wasn't taking notes during so I generally am not positive which panelist said what, and so I usually leave those attributions out. If you want to claim credit, please do!

on the panel )

And now I have half an hour to get some lunch and go to Ursula Vernon's GOH talk.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
If you're considering seeing the movie Arrival, and you HAVEN'T read the story it's based on (Ted Chiang's "Story of Your Life"), I would strongly recommend you keep it that way until after you've seen the movie. Because I've read the story and it definitely got in the way—I mean, I can't guarantee the movie would have attained cohesiveness if I hadn't, but it's getting very good reviews, so I think more likely, at least.

I'm glad it exists as an example of successful smaller-scale prestige SF, and I'm glad I saw it, but more to be up on the conversation than because it really worked for me.

SPOILERS for story and movie )

Ugh, I don't know, I thought it was blazing hot in the theater and Chad didn't, which is so exactly the reverse of our usual reactions that I may be having new and excitingly different symptoms in my cold, so I'm going to find some Tylenol and fall into bed. So this is far from useful but tomorrow is going to be ridiculously busy so I figured a few impressions now were better than nothing.

Oh, trailers, super-quick:

Allied: oh, look, Brad Pitt gets to angst over whether Marion Cotillard is secretly evil and whether he needs to kill her. Pass.

Nocturnal Animals: I have literally no idea what this is about.

Split: the trailer for M. Night Shyamalan's next movie is so stunningly offensive that I'm not linking to it or describing it.

Beauty and the Beast: why. Why does this exist.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
The kids are away for the weekend and there's nothing really compelling in theaters, and we saw The Lobster on the on-demand list and remembered that it sounded interesting and got good reviews. It's an AU of our world where single people have 45 days to fall in love or they get turned into animals.

So one of those reviews was at the A.V. Club, which said,
Bizarre rules and rituals, deliberately stilted dialogue, flashes of grisly violence that threaten to tilt the humor straight into horror: All of this could only have come from the warped imagination of Greek filmmaker Yorgos Lanthimos, here making his singularly strange English-language debut.
And, yeah, basically that, except I found very little humor in it. Really not my kind of thing.

Context-free content notes: )

A note about the ending. Spoilers, naturally. )
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
I have edits on a brief that need to be dealt with, so, Hail, Caesar!, the latest Coen brothers movie, in one paragraph.

It's a movie about a 1950s movie studio executive dude, who runs around putting out fires while contemplating the direction of his life, that fairly regularly stops dead for set-pieces like Channing Tatum singing (I didn't know he could!) and tap-dancing, or Scarlett Johansson in one of those aquatic ballet thingies. I don't have strong feelings about Hollywood movies of this era, I'm aware that the studio system was awful, and I didn't much like the main character or agree with him (the second thing he does is slap a woman twice across the face. The first is go to confession; notably, he goes the next day and confesses only to slapping someone else.). So this was visually attractive and certainly not bland but not something that engaged me.

The trailers were fucking dire and, accordingly, are better left unmentioned. (Now in comments, because [personal profile] skygiants asked.)
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Okay, I graduated high school in 1994, which means that that four-movie run of sheer musical brilliance in Disney animation (The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, and The Lion King) is literally the soundtrack of my high school years, and even though I know a lot of those won't hold up well I still have really fond memories of listening to those soundtracks over and over and over, and thus:



Lea Salonga, the original voice of Jasmine, joins Lin-Manuel Miranda to sing "A Whole New World." Text cannot convey my delight.

(And LMM does quite well, at least as far as I can tell through headphones because the kids are sleeping.)

(Now I just have to finish Steven Universe so I can tell you all about my second-favorite song from it that has peak Disney Princess voice from Deedee Magno Hall as Pearl while subverting classic-Disney-style stories in at least three different ways.)
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
We saw this last Friday and I haven't had the time to write it up, but honestly I'm doing more so out of obligation/putting things on the record: it's very enjoyable and I've barely thought about it since.

Okay, that's not true, because I am an analytical type when it comes to my entertainment, but much less than some other things.

In short: very entertaining; successfully adapts the book in terms of streamlining and making emotions more present (Mark is a very peculiar brand of unreliable narrator, in that he says "I cried" and you don't really feel it on a gut level); surprisingly resists the urge to Hollywood it up until the end; could've done better on casting in terms of racial representation, but it could've been worse, too; whoever did the soundtrack was having a lot of fun.

As for the casting bits: Kapoor is Hindu in the book and is played by Chiwetel Ejiofor in the movie; he does have a line about his father being Hindu and his mother being Baptist in the movie, but when Irrfan Khan turned them down (h/t [personal profile] musesfool), well, it's nice they didn't go with a white guy, but it's not like there's only one Indian actor out there in the world, you know? With that casting, the only visibly Asian main characters were of East Asian ancestry. On a similar note, point for casting Rich Purnell (race not specified in book) with Donald Glover, and minus for not casting Mindy Park with an actress of Korean ancestry. (Point for making one of the guys in China a woman, as well.)

Finally, I don't know what Sean Bean and his non-American accent were doing in this movie. I am entirely willing to believe it was solely in the service of a particular meta joke that had the entire theater laughing uproariously, but I shamefully admit that I think it was worth it: tiny, tiny spoiler ).

And now, some spoilers about the adaptation and ending:

spoilers how for the movie ends, and the book too )

I dipped into the fandom tag on AO3 and was depressed to find it was full of Watney/Beck (a.k.a. the power of two vaguely conventionally attractive white dudes—seriously, they have minimal interaction in the movie, and if you must break up canonical m/f pairings, Martinez is his best friend in the book), so I will take any gen recs from you all, but I can enthusiastically recommend the Interstitial series by Lanna Michaels, which is a book-style continuation (so far two short-ish pieces) that's perfectly in character and just terrific. Also, for the brilliant crack, Lanna also did a fusion with Jonathan Strange. And now the kids' morning TV is done so I will save the trailers until later.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I have to start generating draft post link dumps as I post things to G+.

On movies:

You should be reading Wesley Morris, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his movie criticism, regardless of whether you want to see the movies he's writing about. Here he is about the truly appalling Ted 2:

For people of color, some aspect of friendship with white people involves an awareness that you could be dropped through a trapdoor of racism at any moment, by a slip of the tongue, or at a campus party, or in a legislative campaign. But it’s not always anticipated. You don’t expect the young white man who’s been seated alongside you in a house of worship to take your life because you’re black. Nor do you expect that a movie about an obscene teddy bear would invoke a sexual stereotype forced upon you the way Kunta Kinte was forced to become “Toby” [in Roots].



And as a palate cleanser, his review of Magic Mike XXL.

The AV Club's Random Roles series is almost always great. Here's Diana Riggs, who I've never even seen on screen and who I now want to be when I grow up.

I also love their Expert Witness series; here's a recent one on being a second-unit director on Hollywood blockbusters and one I somehow missed on from a camera operator on the Puppy Bowl.

On TV:

I don't watch Penny Dreadful but [livejournal.com profile] glvalentine's recaps of it are worthy of live-blogging on their own. The one about the most recent episode contains such gems as "Somehow opting not to just go full Gothic and have sex in front of the corpse" and "(He had so much trouble just facing his mother’s death that he made three more people. Then he had sex with at least one of them. The man is troubled.)"

I also don't watch Parks and Recreation (though I'm considering it), but I suspect fans of it would like this vid by [personal profile] such_heights.

On books:

This review of For Such a Time by Kate Breslin makes you wonder how on Earth anyone could possibly think that it was a good idea. (Content notes: Holocaust, dubcon.)

Palate cleanser: absolutely hilarious Imperial Radch AU by Rachel Swirsky.

Miscellany:

@AcademicsSay: The Story Behind a Social-Media Experiment, an interesting look at the growth of that Twitter account and what the academic behind it decided to do with the social capital it had.

Yakhchāls: "By 400 BCE, Persian engineers had mastered the technique of storing ice in the middle of summer in the desert."

A Mostly Accurate Norse God Family Tree, in comic form, with research notes. A.K.A., "TIL that Odin's grandparent was a cow."

The Poet Laureate of Fan Fiction, an interview with someone whose work was appropriated by Supernatural fandom.

Did my boyfriend just get married? on AskMetaFilter; search the poster's username for updates.

What This Cruel War Was Over, the meaning of the Confederate flag in the plain words of those who bore it.

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Saw it last night. It's better than I expected but not as good as many people seem to find it.

I saw it described numerous places as a two-hour chase scene and that just sounded really tiring, especially combined with its over-the-top aesthetic. But it does know that viewers need quiet moments to catch their breath and the pacing works pretty well—though I misunderstood spoilers and thought the movie ended somewhat sooner than it actually did, so that was a little weird for me.

I've seen a lot of praise for the action scenes, particularly their use of actual vehicles. To me, something about the way the first vehicle sequence was shot didn't make it look any more or less "real" than good CGI—I think it may have been slowing down and speeding up things for effect? It wasn't very engaging, anyway, though not as distancing as the truly terrible opening sequence of Ultron. By the last big setpiece I was engaged, but that was probably as much emotional as anything. And, overall, the aesthetic was not particularly my thing (except for Imperator Furiosa, Charlize Theron's character, which (a) has her face and (b) is about the most simple thing in the movie).

Yes, it is about the toxicity of masculinity in a sexist world, and yes, there are lots of matter-of-factly disabled characters, including at least one and possibly two protagonists, depending on how you view things. (However, there is just one obviously non-white character.) But enough was done right about sexism and the female characters that three moments spotlighting male characters at the expense of female characters felt particularly jarring to me—not enough to completely overcome the overall effect, but enough to be distracting and unpleasant.

Finally for general comments, many of the logistics make zero sense, as people have noted. The majority of them I can accept as (a) the product of a deranged mind who doesn't care so much about efficiency as supporting a cult (the water distribution, human milk, gasoline wasting) or (b) the price of admission (Max's likely age). The one I can't actually handwave past is Furiosa having the position she does, actually; she's the only woman we see driving rigs or in a position of explicit authority over men, and I have no idea how she could've got there in this atmosphere. There'd be no movie otherwise, so, price of admission, but I care about her unlike Max, so I poke at the question. (Well, I care about Max, but only with Furiosa. I started getting into the action sequences when they started wordlessly working together, handing each other weapons and trading off shots; and as Chad tells me someone said, there is more chemistry in the bit with the shoulder rest than in the entirety of Ultron.)

Before I get into spoilers, the last thing I can say outside a cut is that that song "Matches" I mentioned last week is totally apropos to this movie. *puts on repeat*

Now, for spoilers. First a thing that is a moderate spoiler but is also an important content note/trigger warning that I haven't seen mentioned elsewhere (though I haven't been reading a ton of stuff about this movie):

moderate spoiler, content note/trigger warning )

And now for the rest of the spoilers.

spoilers )

New-to-me trailers:

Vacation. Oh geez, make it stop. (NSFW.)

San Andreas. I am so fucking over the expectation that I will find the deaths of millions entertaining. Especially when the trailer ends with a super-cynical effort to mitigate its own disaster porn by linking to a disaster preparedness website. Fuck. Off.

Crimson Peak. Nice to see a trailer for something I won't see because it looks good at what it does. (I don't do horror. Which is too bad because, Jessica Chastain's face.)

Terminator Genisys. I like that they're starting with Sarah already badass, but do we really need to keep doing this? I don't think so.

The Transporter Refueled. I entirely checked out during this, other than to note that Jason Statham apparently is too expensive for these now.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
AV Club article on restoring The Apu Trilogy and its burned negatives. I assume those of you who do this sort of thing professionally know about this project already, but, way cool.

The Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell TV adaptation finally has release dates: Sunday, May 17 for BBC One and Saturday, June 13 for BBC America. (I am sure I will have many words to write about this! I'm not sure in what form or where yet, though.)

MCU & Ultron stuff (is that how we're referring to it? A:AoU looks like a werewolf howl): Max Gladstone has interesting thoughts, of which my favorite is the bit about character totems at the very end.

Did I really not link to [personal profile] skygiants's hilarious Ultron summary? Well, there you go.

I transcribed Natasha's speech in That Scene in a comment at Tor.com, which I will probably want to be able to find again (ugh).

Finally, All Trailers Are the Same.

Big Hero 6

Mar. 13th, 2015 09:27 pm
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Okay, I spent most of the movie trying to explain the plot to the Pip, because it's really above the level of a three-year-old (SteelyKid loved it), so I cannot say I gave it 100% of my attention, but I am pretty sure it is absolutely adorable. Nothing surprising plot-wise but charming and nicely diverse (I don't know what I think about the San Francisco-Tokyo mashup, though), and I want a Baymax—both the plush ones you can buy and the movie one I can't.

(Note: does contain a significant character death, as is common for superhero origin stories.)
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
I deliberately avoided finding out much about Interstellar because a while ago I suggested to Chad that we get a babysitter and go see it, as a much-needed break. Here's my verdict.

It's science fiction that's worth seeing if (a) you want to be up on the state of the genre; (b) you like Nolan's visuals and/or space; (c) you really really like sarcastic robots or Jessica Chastain's face, which are small but notable parts of the movie; or (d) you have a high tolerance for at least one plot hole you could drive a truck through and what I am too tired to find a tactful way to call something other than mystical twaddle. (Chad's term, not mine, though he liked it better than I did.) Also a lot of time, because holy fuck, it's long.

so, so many SPOILERS )

Trailers:

Selma (IMDB). I have literally no idea if this is a good trailer because almost the moment it started I was digging my nails into my hands to keep from bursting into tears out of all the present-day resonances. At least it's being made by Oprah Winfrey's company, i.e., not by white people.

The Gambler (IMDB). I have insufficient space to describe the ways in which this is repellent to me.

Chappie (IMDB). The robot's body language is too obviously a human in a suit, and it just doesn't look fresh, which is a disappointment from the District 9 director.

Furious 7 (IMDB). You should watch this trailer, because it has an objectively ridiculous but really fun heist in the first half and a shot that is a literal row of pretty brown people.

Avengers: Age of Ultron (IMDB). If you care about this, you've already seen it and my feelings about it.

Exodus: Gods and Kings (IMDB). WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG WRONG. (Also, please tell me that subtitle doesn't mean it's the start of a series.)

Mockingjay - Part 1 (IMDB). I love you, Katniss! Which makes me very afraid for this movie, but I'll see it anyway.

(I think that's all. I didn't take notes but I went forward through the IMDB's forthcoming pages looking for things I recognized. It was also a lot of trailers.)
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Very sorry to hear that Tom Magliozzi, the one who laughed all the time on Car Talk, has died. I have actually three different pretty strong associations with Car Talk, which is impressive considering that I've never done anything more with a car than add windshield wiper fluid. First, the two years in New Haven when Chad was doing a post-doc and I was in law school; NPR was his alarm clock station and whichever morning Car Talk was on, was timed perfectly for lazy weekend waking-up. (Especially as they've moved into re-runs, the show's occasional but very tired sexism has become more grating to me, so it's weird to have my principal association be soft-focus romantic contentment.) Second, around about SteelyKid's birth I went back to listening to the show, this time as a podcast, and blitzed my way through quite the backlog up in the nursery with her (this association is less strong because I was so out of it during that time). And third, continuing up to the present day, I start my week with Click and Clack: the podcast is released over the weekend, and I default to listening to it on Monday's commute to and from work. In fact, I did that today, but I came home early (more on that in a moment) and had already finished it when I heard the news.

I have spent literally hundreds of hours listening to these guys. I knew what I was hearing was exaggerated personas, but I still enjoyed their company. And hey, their show taught me enough that I knew to take my car in for service for what turned out to be a bad wheel bearing, before the wheel actually fell off: so it was useful too.

The reason I was coming home early is SteelyKid had a tooth out today (she's fine) and Chad had class. But irresponsible though it would have been, I would have been not-so-secretly happy to stay home with her the whole day, because we realized a little bit ago this was the perfect opportunity to show her The Princess Bride for the first time—it's too scary for the Pip—and it was done by the time I got home. I asked her about it after the bleeding stopped and her mood improved (both of which happened at the same time, almost like flipping a switch; it was incredibly bizarre though of course welcome), and we agreed that Wesley's head flopping around on the castle wall was very funny, as was when the Prince got tied up; she also liked Fezzik and the horses, and "the ninja" (the Man in Black) fighting, but thought the Machine was too loud, especially when it went to 50. Chad tells me that Fred Savage's character was a note-perfect stand-in for her, not that this was a surprise; and that she spotted the Man in Black as a good guy right away, which is interesting. I'm sorry I didn't get to see her face—I'm calling dibs on showing it to the Pip now, though we'll have to do it solo so SteelyKid doesn't spoil it all for him—but now I'm flashing back to countless weekends watching it on UHF in my childhood, and feeling warm and fuzzy that I've passed along something so great to her. (Also feeling like a rewatch is due; I know what I'm putting on during stitching the next couple of sessions.)

April 2019

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