kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
when I am not typing while the dog eats her dinner and am about to leave to bring the kids to taekwondo, but:

The reason "If You Were a Dinosaur, My Love" is SFF is that the first time you're reading it, you don't know if it's set in a world where If The Velociraptor From Jurassic Park Were Your Girlfriend (for instance) could be real, and it's that tension about the possibility that gives the story some of its emotional weight.

(Yes, I know the second link came after, I'm using it as an example.)
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
"Dogs never bite me. Just humans." -- attributed to Marilyn Monroe, by [personal profile] rushthatspeaks.

(No, actually, seriously, it has both cute animals pictures and thoughtful commentary, go read it.)
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
I think this comment exchange between Rochita Loenen-Ruiz and Abigail Nussbaum encapsulates the struggle I continue to have over whether to put Mixon above or below No Award, which is how to prioritize the very different messages being sent by Mixon's nomination. If this is a topic that interests you, I recommend reading it.

they're Rabid, not Sad

Wednesday, April 8th, 2015 09:20 pm
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Point to be made about public discourse about the Hugo nominations:

The "Rabid Puppies" slate, the one put forth by Vox Day (a pseudonym for Theodore Beale), is the dominant slate here. It put more nominees on (58 v. 51), and 10 nominees appeared only on it, as opposed to three of the "Sad Puppies" slate (Brad R. Torgersen). (Breakdown via File 770; don't read the comments.)

If you don't know why this matters, you can read a short, rather restrained summary of Day's views at Wikipedia (content notes for sexism, anti-immigrant rhetoric, racism, and sizeism).

I still don't care that much about the Hugos, but it frustrates me to see news articles, blog posts, etc., acting as though the "Sad Puppies" is the only slate that exists and ignoring the more significant influence of Beale/Vox Day.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Laura J. Mixon is the only person on the Best Fan Writer ballot for this year's Hugos who wasn't on the Sad/Rabid Puppy Slate. I want to urge people not to reflexively vote for her, that is, to consider no-awarding the entire category.

I assume that she is nominated on the basis of her lengthy post about Benjanun Sriduangkaew / Requires Hate / Winterfox / etc. I did not discuss this at the time—I found the entire topic disproportionately upsetting because RaceFail [*] (speaking of which, do NOT!!! read the comments)—but that post has serious issues. Yes, it managed to get widespread attention to genuine instances of threats; but it also places people on the "target" list for being called "misogynist" ("Anon, MOC Writer") or for criticizing their writing only (Kress, Adrienne; Lord, Karen). There might be more, because I haven't been able to make myself closely read the accompanying text, I just looked at the Appendices; I recall from back in November seeing criticisms of the framing of the post, but I went back through my reading list of the time and couldn't turn up anything linkable.

(ETA 2: I have now read all the text, see comments for a little more discussion.)

As a result, I have serious doubts whether this post ought to garner its author a Hugo. I encourage those voting to carefully consider the question.

(Anon comments are screened; be polite and sign your comment with a handle for continuity of discussion and I'll unscreen you. If you're new here, note that I moderate comments for gross incivility, anon or not.)

[*] ETA: It has come to my attention, in a genuinely friendly and caring way, that this could use unpacking for people not on my access list. I was upset because I believed, and continue to believe, a number of the first-person accounts of Sriduangkaew's harassment and threats, and because I believed Sriduangkaew's apologies—lousy though they were—were going to work, she was going to get a pass: every time I see, for instance, Elizabeth Bear or Teresa Nielsen Hayden lauded as being especially clueful on questions of oppression, or put on a con panel about codes of conduct (for fuck's sake!), it's like being poked in a bruise, and they never made even lousy apologies for their behavior during RaceFail. My opinion of any of the people who came forward has not changed from what it was, I do not put credit in Sriduangkaew's statements, I do not believe we interacted before her identities were revealed, and I have not interacted with her since.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I'm just gonna quote myself from last year:

There are lots of reasons why people don't read things based on their opinions of the authors. Me, if I know that someone holds views I find morally repugnant, or if I personally dislike them, etc., then I can't keep myself from looking for evidence of those disliked traits in the work, which is unfair to the work, and so I don't even bother. Other people refuse to lend support to live authors, but are okay with dead ones. Other people think the author is dead in the interpretive sense to the extent that they don't care. All of these are valid decisions, because the way people read is so personal and because people make different moral and ethical discussions.

[ . . . ]

All that said, I promised agnosticism, which is this: I genuinely cannot find it in me to care whether the Hugos devolve into, as James Nicoll points out with characteristic brevity and asperity, political parties, or whether prior community norms about politicking prevail, or Vox Day et al. get bored, or whatever. Worst comes to worst, a few years of concerted effort results in actual winners instead of mere nominations for hateful trolls, and a few year after that, booksellers and the like catch up and realize that the Hugo is no longer prestigious, and, well, SFF fandom is big, even the bits of it that self-identify as fandom, and WorldCon and the Hugos are only a small part of that. Maybe Locus stops overweighting subscriber votes and becomes the popular award of record. Maybe the Nebulas experience a surge in prestige. Maybe I hit the lottery and endow a juried award in my honor. Who knows? But the Hugos aren't that big a teapot, at the end of the day, and if people want to self-identify with them and participate in the community that votes on them, great, they should do that, and if people don't, great, they should do that too.

(Reference: this year's "Sad Puppies" Hugo slate—hilariously, not even that contained Vox Day; the just-announced Hugo finalists. (ETA: apparently Vox Day also had a slate, but I am not going to his site on principle (see last year's post, linked above, for context.))

kate_nepveu: green and blue fractal resembling layers of a spaceship (science fiction)
And done my posting about it, too, more to the point. Come talk about them! (Now with miserably embarrassing brain glitch fixed!)

Hugo short stories

Sunday, June 22nd, 2014 02:36 pm
kate_nepveu: green and blue fractal resembling layers of a spaceship (science fiction)
Come talk about them with me, over at the booklog!

(I've also put up a bunch of other posts in the last couple of weeks, too, in case you missed them.)
kate_nepveu: green and blue fractal resembling layers of a spaceship (science fiction)
Hugo voting: to express a preference, put it on the ballot. The upshot: "in a category where you have an opinion about the ranking of all of the items, you should put all of them on your ballot, even the ones you hate."
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Still discussion happening in my Hugo reactions post, if that was a thing that interested you at the time; it seems to have had a slow trickle out onto Twitter, sped up today by John Scalzi linking to it and other criticisms of his position from Shweta Narayan, Arachne Jericho, and Rose Lemberg.

I explained why I took a somewhat different approach than those posters in a comment on my old post, but the criticisms of Rose Lemberg, and SL Huang, about the idea of "merits" generally, are important and worth reading as a broadly-applicable matter. (To be clear, I also recommend Shweta and Arachne's posts as powerful and important, they're just a little more focused on the specifics of this discussion.)

A link roundup is being maintained by Stefan Raets.

I'm going to again err on the side of caution and screen anon comments; I will unscreen them as soon as I can if they're consistent with the policy statements in my profile. So far I haven't had to keep anything screened; I will say so if I do. But, if you have substantive comments rather than something about these links, I'd appreciate it if you took it to the original post, because I hate split discussions.

And now, I must go wash dishes.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

So the nominations for the Hugo Awards (and the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, which is, we must ritually say, Not A Hugo) were announced this weekend, and have already occasioned a fair bit of comment while I was spending quality time with my family. (Here, have some cute kid pics.)

Here are some reactions, and reactions to reactions:

the slate of works pushed by Vox Day, cut for length )

Second:

The Wheel of Time, the fourteen-book epic fantasy series by Robert Jordan and Brandon Sanderson, is nominated for Best Novel in its entirety. Here is where I disagree with some quite good friends, and say that even if this makes sense (and I am not convinced that a fourteen-book series really belongs on a Best Novel category, whether or not that is technically permissible), I didn't nominate it and I'm not voting for it, because frankly I don't think it deserves it. Yes, it more-or-less stuck the landing (ugh, I've still never written up the last volume), but the multiple books of wheel-spinning in the late-middle (I've still never read one of them all the way through; err, also, pun not intended) and the incredibly poor way it handles its gender politics mean that as far as I'm concerned, it would be a nostalgia/tribute vote and not one on its merits.

Third:

There are some really exciting things on the ballot, too. Ancillary Justice is one of the most talked-about novels in my circles this past year, and I look forward to reading it. A blog post about erasure of women from history is nominated for Best Related Work (next year, I nominate medievalpoc for something—Fanzine? Fan Writer?). Sites I read regularly are nominated in Semiprozine and Fanzine (Strange Horizons and The Book Smugglers, respectively). I've been nominating Abigail Nussbaum for Fan Writer for years, and I'm thrilled to see her on the ballot; Liz Bourke and Mark Oshiro also do great work. [*] And the Campbell Award nominees are, as best I can tell, at least 80% non-white-males (and the cover of Max Gladstone's first book, the 20%, looks like this). So that's pretty great.

[*] Though eligibility for Fan Writer, when it comes to paid-for work out on the web for free, is really messed up under the WSFS Constitution (PDF), and badly needs revision. When it's not 11:30 at night I can elaborate, if anyone cares, but really, I'm mostly convinced that it should be changed to "nonfiction writer" instead, as someone-or-other suggested.

Fourth:

All that said, I promised agnosticism, which is this: I genuinely cannot find it in me to care whether the Hugos devolve into, as James Nicoll points out with characteristic brevity and asperity, political parties, or whether prior community norms about politicking prevail, or Vox Day et al. get bored, or whatever. Worst comes to worst, a few years of concerted effort results in actual winners instead of mere nominations for hateful trolls, and a few year after that, booksellers and the like catch up and realize that the Hugo is no longer prestigious, and, well, SFF fandom is big, even the bits of it that self-identify as fandom, and WorldCon and the Hugos are only a small part of that. Maybe Locus stops overweighting subscriber votes and becomes the popular award of record. Maybe the Nebulas experience a surge in prestige. Maybe I hit the lottery and endow a juried award in my honor. Who knows? But the Hugos aren't that big a teapot, at the end of the day, and if people want to self-identify with them and participate in the community that votes on them, great, they should do that, and if people don't, great, they should do that too.

(Note: my availability may be erratic over the next couple of days, so I am screening anon comments in an excess of caution. If you're new here, please review the policy statements in my profile before commenting. Thank you.)

Hugo Nominations

Sunday, April 4th, 2010 05:53 pm
kate_nepveu: green and blue fractal resembling layers of a spaceship (science fiction)
Just pulled out of Convention Reporter's liveblogging without formatting or links, mostly because I wanted them all in one place for my own purposes:

list )

Comments: I have literally never heard of Sawyer's novel nominee, but otherwise this looks . . . not bad. Some stuff I nominated, only one category completely without women if I'm counting right (Pro Artist), at least two people of color in the fiction categories (which AFAIK is one more than last year, um, yay?) and another in the Campbell, some newer/younger/not-the-same names.

I do hope that the short fiction nominees will be able to post their stories online, not just make them available to voters, because I think it's important to the community's discussions and the reputation of the Hugo Awards.

ETA: also up at AussieCon's website, with at least formatting & ballot numbers, though no links.
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Some more Hugo-eligible short fiction that I've read and liked:

"Three Twilight Tales," Jo Walton, Firebirds Soaring (mostly not in bookstores any more, but try your local library)

"The Pirate Captain's Daughter," Yoon Ha Lee, Beneath Ceaseless Skies

"A Journal of Certain Events of Scientific Interest from the First Survey Voyage of the Southern Waters by HMS Ocelot, As Observed by Professor Thaddeus Boswell, DPhil, MSc -or- A Lullaby,", Helen Keeble, Strange Horizons

"And Their Lips Rang with the Sun," Amal El-Mohtar, Strange Horizons

Still reading . . .

And a recommendation: Readability, a browser bookmarklet you can customize to, well, make web pages readable.
kate_nepveu: line drawing of startled cat with vacuum nozzle held to back (fandom)

This is a draft of my ballot for the Fan Writer category in this year's Hugo nominations.

  • Abigail Nussbaum, who blogs at Asking the Wrong Questions (there are links to her reviews at other sites in the sidebar).
  • coffee & ink, who blogs at [personal profile] coffeeandink.
  • K. Tempest Bradford, who blogs all over but principally, for these purposes, at her own site and at The Angry Black Woman.
  • Possibly James Nicoll, who blogs at [livejournal.com profile] james_nicoll; as much as I enjoy his LJ, I tend to think of it more as a news source and discussion place than a source of his writing.
  • Possibly Deepa D., who blogs at [personal profile] deepad; she doesn't post as much as any of the rest of the people on this list, but her posts in January 2009 alone were beautifully written and important.

And though I feel deeply awkward in saying this, the nomination stats indicate that I have previously been nominated in the Fan Writer category by more people than just Chad. So I feel obligated to point out that while my writing here and at my sadly-neglected booklog is non-professional, my writing for Tor.com is professional and thus should not be considered in this regard.

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

So I'm trying to actually read some short fiction before nominating for the Hugos this year, partly because I don't have a lot of time and partly because I'm not very enthusiastic about 2009 novels as a whole.

I've seen:

I have a copy of the anthology Federations which I am slowly working my way through. I've put in a library request for Firebirds Soaring because [livejournal.com profile] papersky's story in it is getting a lot of attention.

So: What have you read that you've liked? What have you published that's eligible? (If you're modest, you can post your eligible lists separately from your recommended lists. I want to know what my friends have published.) Either links or names of things I can get from the library, please. I'm not going to go buying back issues of magazines at this point.

Things I've read so far that I've liked—not a draft ballot, note, and I still have a lot of things left to read even from the above-mentioned sources:

  • "Carthago Delenda Est," Genevieve Valentine, Federations
  • "Bespoke," Genevieve Valentine, Strange Horizons (dilemma! I think I like "Carthago" better, but "Bespoke" is getting more buzz, so, strategy-wise . . . )
  • "Different Day," K. Tempest Bradford, Federations
  • "Élan Vital," K. Tempest Bradford, Sybil’s Garage No. 6
  • "Non-Zero Probabilities," N. K. Jemisin, Clarkesworld

So: go read those, and tell me what to read!

(If you absolutely can't stop yourself, go ahead and rec novels too, but I think I'm pretty well up on the possibilities there (things I have read or am reading but have not booklogged yet are in this LibraryThing collection) and I'd really prefer you focus on short fiction.)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Somehow I'd failed to remember until now that as a member of Anticipation 2009, I'm eligible to nominate works for the Hugo ballot again.

I expect that Terry Pratchett's Nation will make my novel ballot, and I hope to get around to reading Half a Crown, Matter, and Sly Mongoose before February 28. Other recommendations, with reasons please, for works eligible for best novel—and, also, best graphic story?

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Screw flying cars. Where is my in-home custom clothing fabricator?

(Prompted by an unfun trip to get maternity clothes. Chad thought I was going to say "uterine replicator," but I pointed out that even if I wasn't needing maternity clothes now, I'd still have to buy clothes sometime.)

* * *

The first four episodes of Avatar: The Last Airbender were entertaining; pitched a little young, but that did make them undemanding after a long day. We'll probably keep watching.

* * *

Hugo nominees update:

Ragamuffin (booklog) and The Orphan's Tales: In the Cities of Coin and Spice (booklog) for novel; honorable mention to The Secret History of Moscow (booklog), which I am allergic to. The Arrival (booklog) for related book, which you all have to go out and get right this minute, seriously, I mean it!

I may try and squeeze in Acacia, but am unlikely to get to Shelter (I'm sick of winter and am not much for dystopias at the best of times).

* * *

Just a few links, because I've been spending all my delicious time on boskone reports.

links )

kate_nepveu: (con't) http://community.livejournal.com/book_icons/121545.html ; painting of bookcase with light slanting from window (happiness is a full bookcase)

Suddenly it's February, I have less than a month to get my Hugo nomination ballot in order, and so far my ballot consists solely of Shaun Tan's The Arrival (ETA: booklog entry) for Best Related Book. Eek!

cut for lists )

What else? I did a very quick search for 2007 lists and tagged them on delicious, if you're looking for reminders. Recommend me novels: but, it should be accompanied with specific reasons that I, personally, would like it, and as much or more than I might like the three things I plan to read. I will either ignore or mock anyone who fails to follow directions.

Posted elsewhere

Monday, July 23rd, 2007 10:46 pm
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Possibly of interest to those who don't regularly read my book log: non-spoilery and spoilery posts on Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, and my Hugo and Campbell ballot.

AKICILJ: Cambodia

Saturday, July 21st, 2007 10:06 am
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Before I disappear into reading Harry Potter

Is there anyone reading this who is either from Cambodia or is knowledgable about contemporary Cambodian culture, and who's read Geoff Ryman's Hugo-nominated novellete "Pol Pol's Beautiful Daughter" (pdf)? Because I read it last night and its use of Cambodia is making me uncomfortable, but I am very ignorant on the subject.

ETA: I've now booklogged this story and the rest of the nominees in the category.

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