kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Links:

  • I'm sure I'm behind the times here, but I'd never seen actual Quidditch pictures before! (For certain values thereof, I mean.) Via File 770.

  • At Vice, A Cancelled Board Game Revealed How Colonialism Inspires and Haunts Games.

  • I love learning about linguistics and was excited to see this list of linguistics podcasts. I particularly liked en clair, on forensic linguistics, because it has beautiful complete transcripts so I caught up just by reading.

  • The movie Fast Color stars Gugu Mbatha-Raw and is, per the AV Club "part superhero origin story, part multigenerational family drama, part near-future dystopian fable," which sounds relevant to our interests.

  • The Wound of Very Contrition (3940 words) by cosmogyral
    Chapters: 1/?
    Fandom: Hilary Tamar Mysteries - Sarah Caudwell, Oxford Time Travel Universe - Connie Willis
    Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
    Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
    Relationships: Selena Jardine/Julia Larwood
    Characters: Hilary Tamar, Selena Jardine, Julia Larwood, Michael Cantrip, Desmond Ragwort, Kivrin Engle, James Dunworthy
    Summary: The Royal Historical Society seeks from all those who once worked with him a reminiscence of James Dunworthy, lately retired at the peak of his eminence, and I believe the time has come at last for me to give mine. “After all,” as my young friend Selena Jardine said when I asked for her legal advice, “it’s not actually libelous. And I suppose no one but me will be harmed at this stage.” // * // In which Hilary Tamar kidnaps a child from the Middle Ages; and other academic crimes which are, properly considered, James Dunworthy's fault.

    Hi this is the best. (WIP but first chapter is satisfying on its own.)

  • National Geographic, a few years ago, on how extremely precise measurements were taken of Notre Dame. I get emotional when overtired, so I had to stop looking at the news, but I wonder if architectural restorations include all the kludgy bits?

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 14


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
14 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Wednesday morning links are sitting in a newly-renovated car dealership waiting room that is extremely spacious and comfy. If only I'd known that they had free pastries too (though, admittedly, odds are against them being good).

notes on more Avengers: Endgame clips )

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 18


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
18 (100.0%)

big backlog

Apr. 2nd, 2019 05:10 pm
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I was busy! But now I get to wander around mentally singing "I'm freeeee!" a la Elsa. And also, err, start our household taxes and do a lot of laundry. Minor details!

A kid anecdote I told elsewhere on social media when it happened:

Me: time to get up!
The Pip: tell me something I don't know.
Me: The square root of 81 is 9.
The Pip: I knew THAT.
Me: New York does not impose franchise tax on certain 501(c)(3) corporations.
The Pip: I have no idea what you just said.
Me: Something you didn't know! So get up!

And here's a video of a marble run the kids and I improvised last night out of a pretty lousy kit. Design mostly by SteelyKid, because she has spatial abilities and engineering instincts and I do not.


Have a bunch of links:


Two Avengers: Endgame thoughts based on teasers )


Finally, io9 has a big piece on Farscape which reminds me that I watched a few episodes several years ago and just never kept going. That was long ago enough that I'd probably have to start over; so is there a spot in S1 that people would recommend I start at, or episodes in S1 that I should skip? (Admittedly I may just need to not watch in the middle of the night while up with a very small child, which I'd forgotten was my previous mode until I checked the tag, but still.)

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 15


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
15 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

This morning, I woke up 90 minutes before my alarm and struggled to go back to sleep. When my alarm went off, I actually thought I hadn't succeeded . . . before it dawned on me that I had not, in fact, just come back from taking the Pip to see Avengers: Endgame.

In my dream, by the way, I fell asleep in the theater with my eyes open (parallelism!) and, while the Pip was in the bathroom afterward, was asking all the cosplayers what happened. None of them could remember either and were quite disgusted about it. I had to ask the Pip, who told me that squirrels and dogs teamed up to keep Thanos still. (And yes, naturally I tagged the Unbeatable Squirrel Girl on Twitter in the abbreviated version of this story.)


One other kid anecdote originally on Twitter:

SteelyKid wanted to fill out a NCAA Men's Basketball bracket because some friends of hers had, and of course what SteelyKid does, the Pip also wants to do. But I made the mistake of telling him that I'd gotten degrees from Yale and Northeastern . . . so he had them meet in the final because, "Mom! I made you win either way!"

This was incredibly sweet but they were 13 and 14 seeds so they went out on the first day.

(I don't think if he's asked about it since, so I expect he's not that invested in it. But he should have gone with one of Chad's teams, Maryland made it to the second round. (The rest of his Final Four was Old Dominion, because it sounded cool, and Vermont, because he had a nice weekend there once. Those were also both double-digit seeds and went out in the first round.))


And a dog picture: Charlie pupper is an extremely innocent dog who is certainly not lying on anything he shouldn't be.


Links:

  • A story of a jar of bees left in a bookshop.

  • In which Zen Cho is interviewed by her husband and ought to give us that salty take she's saving for another day:

    Most of the SFF about Empire is about fighting Empire—I think because most SFF is and was produced by white Westerners who are working through their undigested feelings about benefiting from imperial domination by writing stories where they imagine themselves into the position of the oppressed. But that’s a salty take for another day!

  • I never liked having human cultures in natural history museums, so I'm glad that the American Museum of Natural History is revising its exhibits.

  • It was, according to someone-or-other, National Puppy Day yesterday! The Atlantic collected photos.


Finally, I had been trying the podcast Placing Faces because I like how-the-sausage-gets-made podcasts and casting directors seemed like a good topic for that. And the first episode was really great, though the host could have worked a little more not to step on the interview subject's toes. and then, ableism )

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 22


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
22 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 22


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
22 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I popped into /r/CrossStitch and found it consumed with talk about Target bags? Turns out the dollar bins at the entrance to stores are selling various bags of perforated faux-leather and the cross-stitching community spotted them. SteelyKid and I had to go to Target for something else, so we grabbed a few small makeup bags; she immediately decided that she was going to stitch one as a watermelon slice and spent a happy while last night marking up the pattern template a Redditor made and going through my floss stash to pick colors. She's chosen a full-coverage design, so we'll see whether she actually finishes the stitching, but if she doesn't I will. (I think I'm going to try and do a Captain Marvel symbol on one of mine.)

Other links:

  • The NYT on how museums decide what to get rid of.

  • Carvell Wallace profiles Samuel L. Jackson:

    This becomes clear to me when I later interview him in the country-club restaurant and he sprinkles n-words and motherfuckers about the dining area like handfuls of glitter as Grandpa- and Memaw-type club members look awkwardly into their eggs Benedict. He behaves not only like a man who belongs here but also like one who basically owns the place. His casual inattention to the perceived authority of white power structures is so deeply woven into his way of being that in his presence it seems bizarre that anyone, anywhere, would think to behave differently. A lot of people like to say they don’t give a fuck. Samuel L. Jackson simply doesn’t.

    (Both the above via Go Fug Yourself.)

  • Chad took this two-second gif of a giant crane chomping a campus building, which just really amuses me.

  • This story about the oldest American picture book still in print is a journey. (Via Tom+Lorenzo.)

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 20


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
20 (100.0%)

linkage

Mar. 15th, 2019 05:57 pm
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
  • I've added this peasant bread to the "recipes I will never actually make" file, based on this glowing rec from [personal profile] rachelmanija. (Edit: and in "small world" news, Chad tells me the author is local, which he knew because the source cookbook was displayed in our corner grocery store for quite a while.)

  • I really like the poem "Ishtar Awakens in Chicago" by Mohja Kahf, which is quoted in this Tumblr post about an art installation that projected part of it on a building.

  • "(O)ne foretelling of doom is happenstance; two seems like attention-seeking" — words of wisdom from Sunless Sea's patch notes. (I have played about twenty minutes of Sunless Sea and I'm not sure my laptop or my sense of direction is up to it, but I'll give it another try soon. Ish.)

  • Please enjoy this review of an extremely obscure and gay book by [personal profile] skygiants; spoiler/content note )

  • On discussing racism in knitting social media, via Reading the End. I felt like a bit of a Fandom Old about this article, partly because I'm very tired and partly because it's about Instagram as a medium for discussion and I find Instagram baffling (seriously, Chad "took over" Union's Instagram for a day and I couldn't figure out how to find what he was doing).

    Minor note: there's a comment about how white knitters would ask knitters of color to meet and discuss in person, which was seen as a way of attempting to exert control. The article says, "online, everyone is closer to being on equal footing; you can’t pressure someone into following the social norms of 'polite conversation.'" I'm not clear if this is paraphrasing the knitter of color quoted earlier in the paragraph, or if this is the article's author; either way, my reaction was definitely "uh, you can't?!" Sure, it's easier in person, but . . .

  • Did you know that there exists Cruel Intentions: The '90s Musical? Now you do.

  • I never watched Project Runway, but this review of the new season makes it sound quite interesting.

  • Stashing for later reading: the current issue of the OTW's journal Transformative Works and Cultures is "Fans of Color, Fandoms of Color."

(I only remember to put the polls in when I draft link dumps in email, sorry . . . )

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 20


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
20 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Links:

Also, I use Quicken Desktop so I can put our upcoming bills in and make sure we have enough money for them (also remind me of recurring bills), but Quicken 2017 has recently stopped syncing and instead of upgrading, I thought I'd try Mint, because honestly the desktop program has always been kind of frustrating and I hate that they've gone to a subscription model. Except Mint . . . doesn't seem to do that? And it definitely doesn't let you reconcile an account, which is just nonsense.

Does anyone have a Windows or online accounting program that they like and that will do these very simple things?

(Edit: I just got Quicken to work again, but I'll take recs anyway fwiw.)

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 8


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
8 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
  • Great piece from Elsa Sjunneson-Henry at Tor.com, What Sabrina Needs to Do to Depict Blindness Realistically, the start of a series "which will delve into how abled people are shown what blindness looks like, and what the reality of blindness is off the page, stage, or screen."

  • Important breaking news via [twitter.com profile] Nicole_Cliffe: per the recent biography The Good Neighbor by Maxwell King, Fred Rogers was bisexual, saying to one of his friends "that if sexuality was measured on a scale of one to ten: 'Well, you know, I must be right smack in the middle. Because I have found women attractive, and I have found men attractive.'"

    Here's the page at Google books; scroll up for context on his initially not encouraging one of the cast members to come out, and don't scroll down for the biographer being biphobic.

  • A good dog who just wanted to race. (Nb. sled dogs are chained outside because they need to develop their winter coats; they have houses and their humans will put out insulating straw or give them coats or whatnot as necessary.)

  • I quite like this rule over at Ask A Manager, in response to question #4 regarding a dog bite. But there are also funny different approaches in the comments.

    The only rule on cover stories for accidents is that they can’t be more glamorous than the actual story. (I just made this rule up.) So you can’t say “I got injured sky-driving with Hugh Jackman,” but you can say “I fell while doing some yard work” or “I had a run-in with a fence” or anything else that could plausibly explain the wounds.

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 21


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
21 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I have posts I want to write but I'm solo parenting this week and didn't feel good last night so must sleep. Sleeeeeep.

(Though upon opening up the draft email where I accumulate things, there is a tiny bit of prose.)

Links:

In non-links news, I tag all my ebooks with genre to help me find things, but why don't I also tag them with things "extremely distinctive first-person narration" to really help me find what I'm in the mood for? Grr. (One of the things I want to be writing is about Ann Leckie's The Raven Tower.)

Finally, elsewhere a friend mentioned Crazy Rich Asians and Ralph Breaks the Internet in conjunction, and I was amused to realize that they both made me think about consumerism, probably in an unintentional way (I deliberately did not actually watch Ralph, just listened while I played games on my phone in the theater, because giving it my undivided attention would have mostly made me think about Disney's cultural dominance), and both had a female character I had a bit of a crush on (Astrid; the racer voiced by Gal Gadot). I suppose you can add in a third thing, that the emotional beats all worked and were solid in both, as long as you could roll with the consumerism.

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 26


+1 (thumbs-up, I see you, etc.)?

View Answers

+1
26 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
  • The Hollywood Reporters, Inside Lucy Liu's Art Studio and Exploring “What We Choose Not to See". Images are mildly NSFW but in, like, an arty way.

  • Genevieve Valentine, Red Carpet Rundown: The 2019 Oscars. Astute and clever as always.

  • Speaking of the Oscars, Slate has loads of logistical details about Melissa McCarthy and Brian Tyree Henry's costumes for presenting the Best Costume Design award, which incorporated elements from all of the nominated movies. I did not watch the awards but I love logistics.

  • Smart Bitches, Trashy Books reviews Lady Derring Takes a Lover by Julie Anne Long, which it doesn't love as a romance but really likes the bit where the wife and mistress of a dead guy decide to start a boarding house together and make a community, which seems relevant to some of your interests.

  • Via [personal profile] musesfool, Atlas Obscura on why people sleep under blankets. As evidence for the "pure conditioning" aspect of it, it took years for the kids to sleep under blankets, because per the current recommendations (well, then-current, anyway, I don't know what they are now because I'm DONE WITH BABIES), they did not sleep under blankets as infants. (We put them in sleep sacks, which are onesies but with a big, well, sack instead of legs.)

  • Over at the Book Smugglers, Lynn E. O’Connacht has an exhaustive post on Asexual Representation In Mainstream Speculative Fiction. I added Breq and Murderbot in the comments, and still feel like I'm missing something; was there someone in Machineries of Empire? My memory for recent-ish texts is so bad these days, honestly.

  • I listened to a podcast today about roads that don't exist—the non-personal stuff starts about seven minutes in—and it seems extremely Rivers of London-ish. The London Ringways were a whole series of roads that were planned, that were dropped in the face of community activism, but that left weird effects on London architecture: a six-story building that was designed to block traffic noise, so it only has tiny windows on the side that was supposed to face the motorway; a building that is at a 30-degree angle to everything around it, aligned with a road that wasn't built; and a miserable park that sits smack between two motorways because it was leftover land and they didn't know what else to do with it.

    The whole time I could just imagine Peter discoursing about it at length upon visiting one of these sites, so if it amuses (or is useful to) you, please enjoy. (This bit cross-posted to [community profile] the_folly.)

  • Planned Parenthood has a period tracker app, which is good news because I trust them much more than the other companies out there—and when I installed it, it asked me if I wanted to know about fertility or not, instead of making assumptions. (See this Vox article.)

  • Via Twitter, a lengthy article from Men's Journal on male action heroes' bodies, changing standards and what the actors go through.

  • On the Leaving Neverland documentary, in which two men accuse Michael Jackson of sexually abusing them as children: Wesley Morris at the NYT; and a set of articles at Slate on multiple issues raised.

Finally, not a link, but: it is FEBRUARY 28 in upstate New York and a MOSQUITO just flew in front of my face. Indoors, obviously, which makes it worse: where did it hatch inside my house?!?!?

Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 19


+1?

View Answers

+1
19 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

We visited my mom and her husband in Florida! It was a bit warmer than usual, mid-80s; their pool was about 70F, so the kids and Chad had a blast and I watched from the side, as usual. We took an airboat tour of the Everglades and saw little dolphins super-close; found shark teeth and shells and dogs on the beach; and generally had a nice unstressful vacation. (The air travel was not the greatest, but we didn't have to stay overnight in an airport hotel like we did coming back from our New Year's trip, so hey.)


A couple links:


Because G+ is shutting down, my community there is testing other social media platforms, and we've moved on to federated/distributed ones. I have a Hubzilla account on an experimental fannish instance, and also a Mastodon account that I haven't started using yet but will soon, probably. If you've got a compatible account, feel free to add me/let me know!

(I really like the idea of Hubzilla and I want someone to make a turnkey install so that I can host my own, a la WordPress, which seems vastly unlikely at the moment, alas.)


Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 9


+1?

View Answers

+1
9 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Linkage:


The kids have been watching Adventure Time after I brought home some of the Ryan North-authored graphic novels from the library because, well, Ryan North; I hear such good things about it but seeing it over their shoulders definitely gives me a lot of sympathy for people who can't with Steven Universe because of the character designs. Perhaps I should do what I did with SU and just listen while stitching until I get into it . . .


Finally, we are visiting family in Florida, and I very much enjoy this picture of a baby gator that Chad took.


Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 11


+1?

View Answers

+1
11 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Links:


[personal profile] skygiants had a dream that "Will Scott, in the Lymond Chronicles, was just a pet rock that Francis had hallucinated was a human being," and now all I want to do is think of other works that would be improved by, or at least lend themselves to, characters actually being pet rocks.

Here's what I've got so far:

  • Draco Malfoy, imagined by Harry;
  • Moby Dick, imagined by Ahab? (I haven't read it);
  • Appa, imagined by Aang; and
  • take your pick of Steven Universe spoilers, and not only for the terrible pun.

What else?

(I did not realize until now that 3/4 of that list are not actually, uhh, human beings; but I think it's within the spirit of the thing.)


Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 7


+1?

View Answers

+1
7 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

Amal El-Mohtar's review of Black Leopard, Red Wolf is, as I'd expect, beautifully written and useful: "the experience of reading this book . . . is more like if Toni Morrison had written Ovid's Metamorphoses: Painful and strange, full of bodies shifting from personhood into meat, and somehow, always, still, upsettingly beautiful."


Via [personal profile] telophase, the offical Captain Marvel movie website is hilarious and fabulous.


Thanks for all the game recs last time, I'll sort through the rest of the comments when I'm less busy!


Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 7


+1?

View Answers

+1
7 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I feel personally attacked by this Liz Climo comic.


The post-dinner game of the moment is Monopoly Cheaters Edition, in which I literally cannot cheat blatantly enough for the kids to catch me. That's mostly because they're not sufficiently vigilant (SteelyKid was playing with slime all during tonight's game), but they also never cheat themselves. I feel like collectively those things probably say something.


Quick on various family games:

  • Sorry. Surprisingly enjoyable yet kid-friendly from really quite a young age? We've been playing it since at least the Pip was in kindergarten and probably earlier. Also, if you deliberately attempt to let kids win or lose less badly--I realize there are things to be said on various sides of this question--it's fairly easy to do so here by tweaking your strategy or flat-out stacking the deck.

  • Hanabi. Cooperative card game, we play without the timer element just because it seemed complicated and I was looking for something very low stress. I don't find it very interesting but the kids enjoy it, so I'm willing.

  • Exploding Kittens. Fun, quick & easy silliness.

  • Qwirkle. Place tiles to match colors or shapes. The rules say have 6 tiles in your hand at a time, we play with a dozen to speed things up. The Pip has thoroughly and legitimately kicked my ass at this on multiple occasions.

  • Incredibles Save the Day. Cooperative board game; very little strategy but, again, cooperative and low-stress and the kids enjoy it.

  • Sushi Go Party. Card game where you assemble sets to score points, while passing the cards around the table. This is really fun, and the difficulty can be adjusted by judicious selection of the menu (and stacking the deck).

  • Monopoly Cheaters Edition. The thing that interests me most about this is the rule tweaks to make it faster (though that's relative, tonight's game was still 90 minutes). An unsold property goes to auction if the person who landed on it doesn't want to buy it immediately; once all properties are sold, the game stops once everyone's gotten back to Go; and one property on each side of the board has a starting boost (free hotel or reduced purchase price). All of those could be imported into regular Monopoly just fine.

    The Cheaters part: there are cards in the center of the board with allowed cheats, like taking an unsold property card or moving someone else's piece. There are specified penalties and rewards for cheating with and without getting caught. I adjust the difficulty by quietly not playing Chance & Community Chest cards that would be too mean and--unsuccessfully, as mentioned above--trying to get caught cheating.

  • Bonus: Blokus Trigon. Place differently-shaped colored tiles on a board so that the same colors touch only at points, not along their sides; try to get as many on as you can. Can be played cooperatively or competitively; we haven't played this enough to really get a feel for it, but I can see the potential. Also I'm very bad at spatial things so I think that will level the playing field.

If you have any recs for board games of similar difficulty, please comment!


Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 17


+1?

View Answers

+1
17 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

This animation of a dragon accordioning into a wall is, as they say, a mood.


Via Courtney Milan, did you know that Stacey Abrams also writes romance novels published by HarperCollins? Because I didn't.


Abigail Nussbaum raises important big-picture questions about S3 of The Good Place that I hadn't gotten as far as because I was being grumpy about smaller-scale stuff. Spoilers, obviously.


I haven't had much time for stitching lately--at home I've been working on my Christmas Nanoblock set--but I really like this freebie curly heart from Mary Corbet. Into the ever-growing stash it goes . . .


Finally, I had a root canal a few years ago, and in the late fall the tooth got infected again. Happily, the endodontist went back in today and didn't find any fractures or other stuff that shouldn't be there, so I guess it was just one of those things. And it only took four and a half hours for me to be able to fully move my face again!


Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 16


+1?

View Answers

+1
16 (100.0%)

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I was going to write something about the kids taking up skiing, but Chad beat me to it. (I am too uncoordinated to take up an activity that involves strapping sticks to my feet and, more importantly, too old to do something that involves falling down a lot. The Pip can fall down every five minutes and bounce right back up without complaint, I really really cannot. Even though downhill looks like a lot more fun than cross-country.)


This comic is super-cute and then I laughed so loud at the added caption that I startled the dog.


I don't even go here but it's really nice to see Anthony Rapp as part of this Rent/Star Trek parody? (My ear's not very good but I think maybe some of those high notes at the end were a little challenging? Still. It's adorable and will only feed my current generalized Rent earworm, post-"live" broadcast. (Which I recorded but did not watch when it transpired that it was 90% a dress rehearsal.))


Finally, some years ago I gave up football on the grounds of fuck the NFL, and I have to admit that it's kind of nice to have thereby neatly avoided the question of whether I still wanted to root for the Pats.

kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)

I am experimenting with accumulating a post over the day in an email draft, because I keep putting links in my bullet journal and then never posting them. Possibly this way I will also journal more broadly? Let's see how this goes.


This morning I posted a selfie on Twitter taken at the end of the dog walk demonstrating two of my personal temperature metrics: breath frozen in the tips of my hair (20F) and breath freezing directly onto glasses (-5F). Not pictured were two others, glasses immediately fogging over after stepping inside (32F) and nostrils trying to freeze over (-5F). What are yours?

(Also I think my hair looks cool like that, I admit. You can see my naturally white hairs up above my glasses.)


Caroline Siede's When Romance Met Comedy series continues to be a joy, this time looking at Bride & Prejudice:

Of all of the modern day adaptations of Pride And Prejudice, I’m not sure any have ever more accurately captured the spirit of Mr. Wickham than the way Bride & Prejudice reimagines him as a hot British backpacker with a performative laid-back cultural sensitivity.


Which condiments need to be refrigerated? at The Takeout: I feel very smug that we have all of these correct.


Interesting Twitter thread about using consultations in game design (for, in this case, colonialism, plotting horror mysteries, and trans/NB representation) and how it worked out. This is about Sunless Skies, the Fallen London folks' new PC game, but no spoilers; and the general principles aren't limited to games.


This morning I listened to a podcast about Dürer's Rhinoceros, which reminded me of the Patrick O'Brian bit about exercising a rhinoceros on a ship's deck, which gives me great joy and I hope will do likewise for you.


Finally, a cozier Twitter selfie, of me sitting on the floor with Charlie pupper's head against one hip and the Pip leaning on my other side.


Posting-by-email experience:

  • I thought email posting automatically used Markdown, but apparently that's only replying to comments, because I still had to put "!markdown" (no quotes) just after the post headers.
  • Markdown allows horizontal rules by three+ hyphens/underscores, but DW thinks that's your email sig, so use three+ asterisks instead.
  • Markdown inline links--square bracketed link text followed immediately by parenthetical link address--didn't work for me. (I think it's because DW is using the GMail plain-text version which wraps the lines and therefore appears to have a blank space between the opening parenthesis and the link.) I used reference-style links instead, which worked great: link text in square brackets, followed immediately by reference in square brackets; elsewhere in document, reference in square brackets followed by colon, space, link. More examples.

Despite all that, this first attempt does seem congenial, since I always have email open and the formatting is easy now that I've worked the bugs out. On the other hand, I'm intending to gradually import all my old public posts into a self-hosted WordPress blog (I apparently can only do it a month at at time) and then cross-post, and maybe just saving stuff as draft in WP will be easier. We'll see.

some links

Nov. 4th, 2018 11:46 am
kate_nepveu: sleeping cat carved in brown wood (Default)
Some things I've been meaning to link to (or did elsewhere), in roughly reverse chronological order.

The Daily Beast, ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ Is an Insult to Freddie Mercury: "The film plays fast and loose with facts in a way that suggests the entire project was born out of resentment from the surviving members of Queen that, all these years after Mercury’s death, the band’s legacy is still so married to their late frontman’s outsize voice, personality, and celebrity. Bohemian Rhapsody smells like cinematic retribution, in which Mercury is posthumously punished. That he’s depicted in such broad strokes is even crueler, with his sexuality reduced to a partying vice and the so-called nitty-gritty of his life fully ignored..."

The AV Club, Whatever twist you’re expecting from this Spies In Disguise trailer, you’re wrong: this headline is 100% accurate.

Ryan North, I am a computer scientist and I am here to tell you to never trust a computer. Especially with voting. There's a step in here that I didn't quite understand, and has elsewhere been explained to me in slightly different terms, one that sounds like magic (and is more what I thought North was saying) and one that doesn't, but the upshot is that it's well-understood by computer scientists that if you can't examine a program down to its binary code--and you can't--then you can't trust it.

The Guardian, Can’t sleep? Perhaps you’re overtired. I have no, I say again no, idea what this is talking about... (Though when I force myself to open up the Calm app and put on one of the "sleep stories", this is why they work, I bet.)

NY Times, Let Our Algorithm Choose Your Halloween Costume. This is a really clear explanation of machine-learning algorithms and also fun silliness. (Definitely follow aiweirdness on tumblr!)

The Players' Tribune, What the Hell Happened to Darius Miles? I read this without knowing who he was, so I wasn't prepared for the turn, but it's great first-person storytelling. (He's ok. Content notes: depression, threatened violence to children, deaths of family members.)

The Atlantic, Seven Square Miles. "[T]he following images are snapshots from Google Earth, all rectangles of the same size and scale, approximately three and a half miles (5.6 kilometers) wide by two miles (3.2 kilometers) tall—showing seven square miles (18.1 square kilometers, or 4,480 acres) of the surface of our planet in each view."

Atlas Obscura, Spiedies. Yes, but we eat them on Italian bread, laid short-wise across and folded up around like a hot dog roll.

Fast Company, The untold story of the vegetable peeler that changed the world. "Over the years, abridged versions of the [OXO Good Grips] peeler’s origin story have been shared in design museums and even business schools. But talking to Smart’s founder, Davin Stowell, I had no clue how rich the history was, including cameos from Monsanto, samurai sword makers, and retail magicians from another era. What follows is his lightly edited story–an insider’s account of the world’s most famous vegetable peeler."

Smart Bitches, Trashy Books, Book Review: The Real Lolita by Sarah Weinman. Content note: "this review contains discussion about the kidnapping and sexual assault of an eleven-year-old girl, as well as a broader examination of how our culture treats rape victims." 

Blair Braverman, #bravermountainadventcalendar. A bunch of favorite Twitter threads about sled dogs. @BlairBraverman is one of the best Twitter follows I've made.

There's more, there's always more, but I (also always) have other things I ought to be doing now.

April 2019

S M T W T F S
 1 23456
789 10111213
14 151617181920
21222324252627
282930    

Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags

Syndicate

RSS Atom